Acheulean


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Acheulean

[ə′shül·ē·ən]
(archeology)
Lower Paleolithic archeological time, characterized by biface tools having cutting edges all around.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Acheulean stone tools (mentioned earlier) are dealt with in chapter 2 ("1,000,000 Years Ago").
The technique also reached Europe around 250,000 years ago; the Neanderthals, until they disappeared, used a mix of Acheulean and Mousterian techniques.
If West Asian and African populations independently learned this Mousterian technique while still producing Acheulean hand axes in a process dating back 1.
2010a): "Mid-Pleistocene Acheulean industrial complex in the Iberian Peninsula", Quaternary International, 223-224, pp.
Neste contexto, o ensaio intitulado A million years of style and function: regional and temporal variation in Acheulean handaxes (Vaughan 2001), aborda, de maneira clara e objetiva, conceitos utilizados em Arqueologia evolutiva.
The Acheulean handaxe is one of the most iconic, analysed and fiercely debated artefacts flora the prehistoric period.
Here I would like to quote from the Introduction to my book Juniper Fuse: Upper Paleolithic Imagination & the Construction of the Underworld:</p> <pre> In the late 1970s, Alexander Marshack showed Caryl and me a photo of an incised ox rib from an Acheulean dig near Bordeaux.
For example, the Acheulean hand axe tradition lasted for more than one million years in Africa, Asia, and Europe.
The tools themselves are much more complex, the bifacial tools being particularly worthy of note, which are characteristic of a culture or industry called Acheulean (a name derived from the French remains at Saint-Acheul in Picardie).
This massive span has up until now been conceived as a vague whole resting on an image of continuity: the continuity of Australopithecus with Homo habilis, of Homo habilis with the various Homo erectus, of Homo erectus with the various Homo sapiens; even the continuity of "civilizations" (Oldowan, Acheulean, and the "cultures" of the middle and upper paleolithic).
2010): A geometric morphometric assessment of plan shape in bone and stone Acheulean bifaces from the Middle Pleistocene site of Castel di Guido, Latium, Italy.