succinic acid

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Related to Acid of amber: Butanedioic acid

succinic acid:

see Krebs cycleKrebs cycle,
series of chemical reactions carried out in the living cell; in most higher animals, including humans, it is essential for the oxidative metabolism of glucose and other simple sugars.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Succinic Acid

 

HOOCCH2CH2 COOH. Also known as butanedioic acid, succinic acid is a colorless, crystalline compound that is soluble in ethanol, ether, and water.

Succinic acid has a melting point of 185°C and a density of 1.563 g/cm3 at 20°C. It is found in small amounts in brown coal, amber, plants, and animals; it is an intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

Succinic acid is produced industrially mainly by the hydrogenation of maleic anhydride. The acid itself and a number of its derivatives—including its anhydride, monoamides, diamides, and esters and salts (succinates), as well as succinimide—are used in the production of various plastics, polyester resins, dyes, insecticides, and pharmaceuticals; they are also used in the synthesis of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

succinic acid

[sək′sin·ik ′as·əd]
(organic chemistry)
CO2H(CH2)2CO2H Water-soluble, colorless crystals with an acid taste; melts at 185°C; used as a chemical intermediate, in medicine, and to make perfume esters.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.