aconite

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Related to Aconites: Eranthis hyemalis, winter aconite

aconite

(ăk`ənīt),

monkshood,

or

wolfsbane,

any of several species of the genus Aconitum of the family Ranunculaceae (buttercupbuttercup
or crowfoot,
common name for the Ranunculaceae, a family of chiefly annual or perennial herbs of cool regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Thought to be one of the most primitive families of dicotyledenous plants, the Ranunculaceae typically have a simple
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 family), hardy perennial plants of the north temperate zone, growing wild or cultivated for ornamental or medicinal purposes. They contain violent poisons that were recognized from early times and were mentioned by Shakespeare (2 King Henry IV, iv:4); more recently they have been used medicinally in a liniment, tincture, and drug, and in India on spears and arrows for hunting. The drug aconite, the active principle of which is the alkaloid aconitine, is used as a sedative, e.g., for neuralgia and rheumatism, and is obtained from A. napellus. Aconites are erect or trailing, with deeply cut leaves and, in late summer and fall, hooded showy flowers of blue, yellow, purple, or white. The name wolfsbane derives from an old superstition that the plant repelled werewolves. Winter aconite is a name for plants of the genus Eranthis, wild or garden perennials of the same family. Aconites are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Ranunculales, family Ranunculaceae.

Aconite

(pop culture)

Aconite (aconitum napellus) is another name for wolfsbane or monkshood. This poisonous plant was believed by the ancient Greeks to have arisen in the mouths of Cerberus (a three-headed dog that guards the entrance to Hades) while under the influence of Hecate, the goddess of magic and the underworld. It later was noted as one of the ingredients of the ointment that witches put on their body in order to fly off to their sabbats. In Dracula (Spanish, 1931), aconite was substituted for garlic as the primary plant used to repel the vampire.

Sources:

Emboden, William A. Bizarre Plants: Magical, Monstrous, Mythical. New York: Macmillan Publishing, 1974. 214 pp.

Aconite

 

(Aconitum), monkshood, a genus of perennial herbaceous plants of the family Ranunculaceae. Roots are tuberous and thickened; leaves palmate-incised or palmate-compound; flowers yellow, blue, or violet, rarely white, arranged in a more or less thick apical raceme. The calyx consists of five petaloid colored bracts. The upper bract resembles a helmet covering two nectaries (modified petals). About 300 species grow in the northern hemisphere, about 75 of these in the USSR. Most of the aconite species are poisonous; they contain alkaloids such as aconitine and zongorine. Many aconite species are cultivated as ornamentals.

aconite

[′ak·ə‚nīt]
(botany)
Any plant of the genus Aconitum. Also known as friar's cowl; monkshood; mousebane; wolfsbane.
(pharmacology)
A toxic drug obtained from the dried tuberous root of Aconitum napellus; the principal alkaloid is aconitine.

aconite

, aconitum
1. any of various N temperate plants of the ranunculaceous genus Aconitum, such as monkshood and wolfsbane, many of which are poisonous
2. the dried poisonous root of many of these plants, sometimes used as an antipyretic
References in periodicals archive ?
Aconite, used in Chinese herbal recipes, requires proper processing before being deemed safe for human consumption.
For a really good splash throughout the late winter and spring, you can't beat the old favourites, such as snowdrops (Galanthus), winter aconites (Eranthis), daffodils, crocus, hyacinth and tulips.
Once you have an established drift of winter aconites, a number of the bulbs should be dug up and replanted immediately after they have flowered and with a bit of green leaf attached.
Visitors can explore the gardens and enjoy walks around the lake and through the Peninsula Wood, where early snowdrops and aconites bloom and early spring flowers are starting to show.
Daffodils are to spring what roses, irises and lilies are to summer What sunflowers and chrysanthemums are to autumn and hellebores and aconites are to winter
The most common, G nivalis, looks good planted with other bulbs which flower at the same time, including aconites and cyclamen.
This is best done in spring - but wash your hands after because aconites are poisonous.
Drifts of golden flowered winter aconites are in flower among the horse chestnut trees and hundreds more bulbs, including crocus and cyclamen, have been planted and many will be in flower on the day.
WITH buttercup-like flowers on glossy green foliage from January to March, winter aconites, or Eranthis hyemalis, can really cheer up a garden.
Rake the lawn to remove old thatch and lift and transplant snowdrops and aconites ?
Further south in Wiltshire Heale Gardens is also renowned for its annual drifts of snowdrops and aconites that provide early welcome colour.
Given these conditions, our native wild Primrose will associate itself with many other woodland favourites, including Snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis), Winter Aconites (Eranthus hyemalis), Periwinkle (Vinca minor), Cyclamen hederifolium, Narcissi and Violas.