acoustic coupler

(redirected from Acoustically coupled modem)
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acoustic coupler

[ə′küs·tik ′kəp·lər]
(engineering acoustics)
A device used between the modem of a computer terminal and a standard telephone line to permit transmission of digital data in either direction without making direct connections.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

acoustic coupler

(hardware, communications)
A device used to connect a modem to a telephone line via an ordinary handset. The acoustic coupler converts electrical signals from the modem to sound via a loudspeaker, against which the mouthpiece of a telephone handset is placed. The earpiece is placed against a microphone which converts sound to electrical signals which return to the modem. The handset is inserted into a sound-proof box containing the louspeaker and microphone to avoid interference from ambient noise.

Acousitic couplers are now rarely used since most modems have a direct electrical connection to the telephone line. This avoids the signal degradation caused by conversion to and from audio. Direct connection is not always possible, and was actually illegal in the United Kingdom before British Telecom was privatised. BT's predecessor, the General Post Office, did not allow subscribers to connect their own equipment to the telephone line.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

acoustic coupler

A device that connects a terminal or computer to the handset of a telephone. It contains a shaped foam bed that the handset is placed in, and it also may contain the modem.


Acoustic Coupler
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