acre-foot

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acre-foot

[′ā·kər ′fu̇t]
(hydrology)
The volume of water required to cover 1 acre to a depth of 1 foot, hence 43,560 cubic feet; a convenient unit for measuring irrigation water, runoff volume, and reservoir capacity.

acre-foot

The amount of water required to cover an area of 1 acre to a depth of 1 foot; equivalent to 43,560 cubic feet (4046.9 m3); sometimes used as a measure of materials in place (e.g., gravel).
References in periodicals archive ?
But no court -- trial court or court of appeal -- said yes, you may rely on the 41,000 acre-feet for planning purposes.
If there was a way to keep it, AVEK could supply at least an additional 50,000 acre-feet this winter for storage, Fuller said.
Meantime, local water supply from all current sources - including allocations from the State Water Project, groundwater and recycled sources - is projected at 125,680 acre-feet for 2030.
Conservation could cut it down to 125,370 acre-feet.
Castaic Dam is 340 feet tall and holds 323,000 acre-feet of water.
Cooper on Monday ordered the DWP to complete a project by June 2007 in order to reduce groundwater pumping in the Owens Valley from 90,000 acre-feet annually to 57,412 acre-feet.
A 90% percent allocation amounts to 3,713,117 acre-feet, distributed among the 29 long-term SWP Contractors who serve more than 23 million Californians and about 750,000 acres of irrigated farmland.
5 million, would involve the construction of a detention basin capable of handling 773 acre-feet of water.
The Department's recycled water system expansion, when complete, will more than double recycled water use in Long Beach from 4,000 acre-feet to 9,000 acre-feet annually, eventually meeting 12 percent of the city's total water demand.
Removing 270,000 cubic yards would give the reservoir extra space for about 167 acre-feet of water.
42 million to upgrade the Compton Municipal Water Department's pipelines and wells to allow the city to pump a total of 2,289 acre-feet of Metropolitan's imported water in to the local groundwater aquifer.