Acrochordidae

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Acrochordidae

 

a family of nonpoisonous aquatic snakes.

There are six genera of Acrochordidae and seven or eight species. They are distributed from India and Indochina to New Guinea. The most important representative of Acrochordidae is the Javan wart snake (Acrochordus javanicus), which is up to 2.5 m long. It lives in rivers and feeds on fish and frogs. The females produce as many as 32 fully developed young enclosed in egg sacs, from which they immediately hatch. Acrochordidae swim easily and rapidly. They can get along for hours without pulmonary respiration. Acrochordidae do not come out on dry land.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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They were, however, able to observe 10 'duhol basahan' (Acrochordus granulatus), which is often confused with duhol matapang due to their almost similar features.
Norah adopted Ruth into her family, naming her 'Pitjiri', after the file snake (Acrochordus javanicus) that floats on the water in the wet season.
Facultative parthenogenetic reproduction in vertebrates has been presumed to have occurred in the common water snake Nerodia sipedon (Skalka and Vozenilek, 1986), the Javan wart snake Acrochordus javanicus (Magnusson, 1979), the file snake A.
VARANIDAE Varanus salvator Biawak Varanus bornensis Biawak Kalimantan SERPENTES BOIDAE Python reticulatus Ular Sawa, Ular Petola ACROCHORDIDAE Acrochordus javanicus COLUBRIDAE Calamaria leucogaster Dendrelaphis pictus Telampar Ahaetulla sp.
Sexual differences in morphology and niche utilization in an aquatic snake, Acrochordus arafurae.
Two aquatic species, the freshwater crocodile (Crocodylus johnstoni) and the filesnake (Acrochordus arafurae) spend the dry season in isolated billabongs (small waterbodies) but move into shallowly inundated areas with the advent of wet season flooding (Webb et al.