acrostic

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acrostic

(əkrŏ`stĭk), arrangement of words or lines in which a series of initial, final, or other corresponding letters, when taken together, stand in a set order to form a word, a phrase, the alphabet, or the like. A famous acrostic was made on the Greek for Jesus Christ, God's Son, Savior: Iesous Christos, Theou Uios, Soter (ch and th being each one letter in Greek). The initials spell ichthus, Greek for fish; hence the frequent use of the fish by early Christians as a symbol for Jesus. There are several alphabetic acrostics (pertaining to the Hebrew alphabet) in the Bible, e.g., in Ps. 119 and LamentationsLamentations,
book of the Bible, placed immediately after Jeremiah, to whose author it has been ascribed since ancient times. It was probably composed by several authors. It is a series of five poems mourning the destruction of Jerusalem by Babylon.
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. Acrostic verses are common, and very elaborate puzzles have been devised combining several schemes.

Acrostic

 

a poem in which the first letter of each line forms a word or phrase when read from the top downward. Acrostics originated in ancient Greek poetry and are found in Russian poetry from the 17th century onward. Poems in which a word is formed from the last letter of each line (telestic) or the middle letter (mesostic) occur less frequently. The sonnet “To Valerii Briusov” by M. Kuzmin is an acrostic. The first three lines read:

Voluminous waves direct their surf
At cliffs that still stand firm.
Lo! An eagle flies past the pitiful sights . . .   

acrostic

a. a number of lines of writing, such as a poem, certain letters of which form a word, proverb, etc. A single acrostic is formed by the initial letters of the lines, a double acrostic by the initial and final letters, and a triple acrostic by the initial, middle, and final letters
b. the word, proverb, etc., so formed
c. (as modifier): an acrostic sonnet
References in periodicals archive ?
In the following edition, compiled by Crowley in 1582, three acrostic poems appear, all on the second page of the book (A1v).
The consolation in The Lamentations of Jeremy is translated into English; it already exists in the form of an ancient, acrostic poem, already translated, paraphrased, and set to music often since the Middle Ages.
In the meantime, the articl e on Farjado, which begins with an acrostic poem about his inauguration into office (misa de vara), can be a model for other historians who wish to write about the Pampanga/Tarlac region and its politics and culture.
We do have a second acrostic poem written by a famous Assyrian, King Ashurbanipal (669-c.
1 and 9, and the acrostic poem on the wife, 31:10-31).
Following is a "Stress Awareness" example of an Acrostic poem.
The history of the former, on the other hand, is both more complex and far more ancient, stretching back at least as far as a 4th-century acrostic poem on the prophecy of the Erythraean Sibyl.
The first, centre and last letters of each line of his acrostic poem spells Liverpool when read vertically.
We decided that an acrostic poem would be the perfect vehicle to provide snappy sentences that could suggest colorful images.
Together they created an acrostic poem as I wrote their words on the chalkboard.