acrostic

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acrostic

(əkrŏ`stĭk), arrangement of words or lines in which a series of initial, final, or other corresponding letters, when taken together, stand in a set order to form a word, a phrase, the alphabet, or the like. A famous acrostic was made on the Greek for Jesus Christ, God's Son, Savior: Iesous Christos, Theou Uios, Soter (ch and th being each one letter in Greek). The initials spell ichthus, Greek for fish; hence the frequent use of the fish by early Christians as a symbol for Jesus. There are several alphabetic acrostics (pertaining to the Hebrew alphabet) in the Bible, e.g., in Ps. 119 and LamentationsLamentations,
book of the Bible, placed immediately after Jeremiah, to whose author it has been ascribed since ancient times. It was probably composed by several authors. It is a series of five poems mourning the destruction of Jerusalem by Babylon.
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. Acrostic verses are common, and very elaborate puzzles have been devised combining several schemes.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Acrostic

 

a poem in which the first letter of each line forms a word or phrase when read from the top downward. Acrostics originated in ancient Greek poetry and are found in Russian poetry from the 17th century onward. Poems in which a word is formed from the last letter of each line (telestic) or the middle letter (mesostic) occur less frequently. The sonnet “To Valerii Briusov” by M. Kuzmin is an acrostic. The first three lines read:

Voluminous waves direct their surf
At cliffs that still stand firm.
Lo! An eagle flies past the pitiful sights . . .   
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

acrostic

a. a number of lines of writing, such as a poem, certain letters of which form a word, proverb, etc. A single acrostic is formed by the initial letters of the lines, a double acrostic by the initial and final letters, and a triple acrostic by the initial, middle, and final letters
b. the word, proverb, etc., so formed
c. (as modifier): an acrostic sonnet
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In the acrostic poems, the dominant pattern is the iambic tetrameter, though it is not always carefully observed.
The teacher introduced two types of poetry writing: free verse and acrostic poems, to teach writing in meaningful ways and using the multicultural text.
Through language activities such as let's listen to the sounds of the words, the same and the opposite, what is similar and what is different, play with rhymes, the acrostic poem the children learned new words.
A Breckfield Lamby would brighten up this Victorian school, Our reception have a motto: 'LAMBANANAS RULE' Our acrostic poem: Lovely AmAzing SMiley Bright GreAt FaNtastic RAinbow WoNderful FAbulous GorgeouS
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] SUNSHINE (an acrostic poem) Shown off as a great dog Usually very bright Needs much attention She loves Milkbones Has a wonderful personality Is very much into exploring Never gives up Eager for love.
An example of an acrostic poem in the Bible is the book Lamentations, though it loses its acrostic form and impact, in its translation into English.
Writing Activity: After reading this text, use the letters in Manzanar and create an acrostic poem, highlighting key features of life in a Japanese relocation camp.
Language Arts--Ask each student to write an acrostic poem using their names as the first line.
In the meantime, the articl e on Farjado, which begins with an acrostic poem about his inauguration into office (misa de vara), can be a model for other historians who wish to write about the Pampanga/Tarlac region and its politics and culture.
We do have a second acrostic poem written by a famous Assyrian, King Ashurbanipal (669-c.630) himself.
1 and 9, and the acrostic poem on the wife, 31:10-31).
Following is a "Stress Awareness" example of an Acrostic poem.