acrostic

(redirected from Acrostics)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Acrostics: double acrostics

acrostic

(əkrŏ`stĭk), arrangement of words or lines in which a series of initial, final, or other corresponding letters, when taken together, stand in a set order to form a word, a phrase, the alphabet, or the like. A famous acrostic was made on the Greek for Jesus Christ, God's Son, Savior: Iesous Christos, Theou Uios, Soter (ch and th being each one letter in Greek). The initials spell ichthus, Greek for fish; hence the frequent use of the fish by early Christians as a symbol for Jesus. There are several alphabetic acrostics (pertaining to the Hebrew alphabet) in the Bible, e.g., in Ps. 119 and LamentationsLamentations,
book of the Bible, placed immediately after Jeremiah, to whose author it has been ascribed since ancient times. It was probably composed by several authors. It is a series of five poems mourning the destruction of Jerusalem by Babylon.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Acrostic verses are common, and very elaborate puzzles have been devised combining several schemes.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Acrostic

 

a poem in which the first letter of each line forms a word or phrase when read from the top downward. Acrostics originated in ancient Greek poetry and are found in Russian poetry from the 17th century onward. Poems in which a word is formed from the last letter of each line (telestic) or the middle letter (mesostic) occur less frequently. The sonnet “To Valerii Briusov” by M. Kuzmin is an acrostic. The first three lines read:

Voluminous waves direct their surf
At cliffs that still stand firm.
Lo! An eagle flies past the pitiful sights . . .   
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

acrostic

a. a number of lines of writing, such as a poem, certain letters of which form a word, proverb, etc. A single acrostic is formed by the initial letters of the lines, a double acrostic by the initial and final letters, and a triple acrostic by the initial, middle, and final letters
b. the word, proverb, etc., so formed
c. (as modifier): an acrostic sonnet
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Critique: Anyone who delights in solving crossword puzzles will be equally entertaining with the fifty acrostic puzzles comprising "Quote Acrostic Favorites: Volume 3".
letters forming the acrostic by coloring those letters red.
In "More About Acrostics," the poet discusses various aspects of the acrostic including its etymology.
African Acrostics is inspiration for budding poets and their masters.
identity into the acrostics that he composes in the margins of his
To create an interpretative acrostic, write the title of a work of art vertically on a page, one letter to a line, then pinpoint the most important ideas expressed by the artwork.
The authors introduce an important point about acrostics, hardly mentioned by previous writers: "As often, if not always, in the symmetrical pattern of calculations of the biblical writers and especially the editors, there are significant deviations from the established norm" (p.
"Anagrams and Acrostics: Puritain Poetic Wit." In Puritan Poets and Poetics: Seventeenth-Century American Poetry in Theory and Practice, ed.
The association with Moosburg is clear: two acrostics (fols.
A check, however, on the other 1000 stanzas of the work suggests, on grounds of statistical probability alone, that the acrostics quoted are not at random.
We have reason to believe the witness is a fan of acrostics. Eyewitness #2 seems to be trying to tell us what action we should take.
His introduction discusses such matters as the place of Lamentations in the canon, authorship, Mesopotamian links, alphabetic acrostics, texts and versions, and theology.