act


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act

1. the formally codified result of deliberation by a legislative body; a law, edict, decree, statute, etc.
2. a formal written record of transactions, proceedings, etc., as of a society, committee, or legislative body
3. a major division of a dramatic work
4. 
a. a short performance of skill, a comic sketch, dance, etc., esp one that is part of a programme of light entertainment
b. those giving such a performance
5. Philosophy an occurrence effected by the volition of a human agent, usually opposed at least as regards its explanation to one which is causally determined

ACT

(in New Zealand) Association of Consumers and Taxpayers: a small political party of the right

act

  1. to carry out or perform any unit or sequence of social behaviour. See ACTION.
  2. to play or act out social roles as if on a stage. See DRAMATURGY.
  3. any unit of ACTION or behaviour.
  4. the ‘accomplished act’ rather than the process of social action (Schutz, 1972). See also ACTION.

ACT.

On drawings, abbreviation for “actual.”

ACT

(software)

ACT

(company)

Act

A very popular customer relationship management (CRM) application for Windows from Swiftpage ACT! LLC (www.act.com). Officially titled with an exclamation point, reps use Act! to review the notes they previously took along with their customers' email messages and Facebook profiles. A Mac version, now discontinued, was offered earlier.

Act! integrates with popular applications and enables customer reps to access the data simultaneously. Cloud and hosted versions along with custom solutions are also available.

Originally a DOS program for contact names, Act! debuted in 1987 from Conductor Software, later renamed Contact Software International. Although Act!'s ownership changed several times, it evolved into a comprehensive application for the sales professional to organize and track customer details. The product moved from Contact Software to Symantec to SalesLogix (renamed Interact Commerce) to the Sage Group and then Swiftpage in 2013.


An Act! Contact Record
These screen shots from an earlier version of Act! show each contact in a name and address record (top) from which activities are scheduled (bottom right). Activity history is on the bottom left.
References in classic literature ?
They thought it reasonable, that between the interfering acts of an EQUAL authority, that which was the last indication of its will should have the preference.
As all of these, however, had reference, either to the recommendation from the meeting at Annapolis, in September, 1786, or to that from Congress, in February, 1787, it will be sufficient to recur to these particular acts.
Realists, on the other hand, as a rule, suppress the content, and maintain that a thought consists either of act and object alone, or of object alone.
There are two different kinds of realism, according as we make a thought consist of act and object, or of object alone.
You are a sort of monster," I added audaciously, "a Caliban who has pondered Setebos, and who acts as you act, in idle moments, by whim and fancy.
They sent a humble petition to the king, and a memorial to the Parliament, beseeching that the Stamp Act might be repealed.
Such is the state of affairs at the opening of the Second Act.
You would have struck your husband dead at your feet; and by that rash act, you would have deprived yourself of the insurance money settled on the widow-- the very money which is wanted to relieve your brother from the unendurable pecuniary position which he now occupies
During this act every time Natasha looked toward the stalls she saw Anatole Kuragin with an arm thrown across the back of his chair, staring at her.
When the second act was over Countess Bezukhova rose, turned to the Rostovs' box- her whole bosom completely exposed- beckoned the old count with a gloved finger, and paying no attention to those who had entered her box began talking to him with an amiable smile.
Sergey Ivanovitch read the act and began to explain its meaning, but at that point a tall, stout, round-shouldered landowner, with dyed whiskers, in a tight uniform that cut the back of his neck, interrupted him.
He forgot, as Sergey Ivanovitch explained to him afterwards, this syllogism: that it was necessary for the public good to get rid of the marshal of the province; that to get rid of the marshal it was necessary to have a majority of votes; that to get a majority of votes it was necessary to secure Flerov's right to vote; that to secure the recognition of Flerov's right to vote they must decide on the interpretation to be put on the act.