action research

(redirected from Action inquiry)
Also found in: Medical.

action research

a form of research carried out with the aim of inducing changes in social activities (e.g. increased participation in cultural events), but with the aim of also studying these changes. See PARTICIPATORY ACTION RESEARCH.
References in periodicals archive ?
Women sitting on government boards (School Management Committee, Health Management Committee, Forestry Committee, Drinking Water Committee, Village Development Committee), political leaders and women's activists (women's network, mother groups, women's reproductive health rights committee) were invited and agreed to participate making up the Action Inquiry Group.
Exploratory meetings took place with the action inquiry group.
They describe mentoring and supervision, the personal and professional aspects of supervising others, the workplace as a learning environment, practice settings as a learning resource, identifying the learner's needs and documenting a learning plan, facilitating professional development, assessing progress, giving feedback and documenting progress, using action inquiry to reflect on personal and professional practice, and personal and professional development planning.
Whether known as action inquiry (Torbert and Taylor 2008), action science (Argyris 1999), utilization-focused evaluation (Patton 2008), practitioner research (Bensimon et al.
One in 15 is affected, says a World in Action inquiry which highlights the sometimes tragic consequences for patients.
Three forms this inquiry might take are cooperative inquiry, participatory inquiry and action inquiry. Cooperative inquiry, the approach with which Reason is most identified, is described in most detail and is the focus of many of the subsequent chapters.
The state action inquiry is not particularly difficult when an agency or officer of the government has allegedly violated the constitutional rights of an individual.(9) The analytical exercise can become decidedly squirrelly, however, when the actions of an ostensibly "private" entity violate constitutional norms, and the entity enjoys some kind of special relationship or connection to the federal or a state government.(10)
The chapter on action inquiry is particularly untidy, leaving the reader with essential questions such as "what is action inquiry?" and "Does the author provide a slanted example of mainstream inquiry in order to advance his own perspectives on 'good' social scientific inquiry?"
Identifying the potential benefits of action research for self-learning and the learning of others, McNiff and Whitehead offer education professionals advice on how to undertake an action inquiry, and to produce a quality report for publication and further dissemination.

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