Actium


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Actium

(ăk`tēəm, –shē–), promontory, NW Acarnania, Greece, at the mouth of the Ambracian Gulf. There are vestiges of several temples and an ancient town. At Actium was fought the naval battle (31 B.C.) in which the forces of Octavian (later Augustus) under Agrippa defeated the sea and land forces of Antony and Cleopatra. The battle established Octavian as ruler of Rome. The Actian games, held at NicopolisNicopolis
[Gr.,=city of victory], ancient city, NW Greece, in Epirus. It was founded by Octavian (later Augustus) to celebrate the victory (31 B.C.) at Actium, which is nearby. The city largely eclipsed Ambracia (see Árta). It is mentioned by St. Paul (Titus 3.12).
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 every four years, were established to commemorate the event.

actium

[′ak·tē·əm]
(ecology)
A rocky seashore community.

Actium

Octavian’s naval defeat of Antony and Cleopatra (31 B.C.). [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 15]
See: Battle

Actium

a town of ancient Greece that overlooked the naval battle in 31 bc at which Octavian's fleet under Agrippa defeated that of Mark Antony and Cleopatra
References in periodicals archive ?
He had said it before in the Histories as well, when he stated that after the battle of Actium there were no historians who could write 'proper' history:
Herodes habilidosamente dedicou os jogos ao patrono Augusto em comemoracao a vitoria do imperador na batalha de Actium em 31 AEC.
The obelisk, part of the spoils of the Battle of Actium (31 BCE), bore this inscription: 'Egypt having been brought under the dominion of the Roman people'.
An example of Virgil's pandering to Augustus is the shield of Aeneas that depicts the defeat of Marc Anthony and Cleopatra at Actium in Aeneid VIII.
Pak worked earlier as a managing director at private equity firm Actium Corp.
After the famous Actium battle, Egypt becomes a part of the Roman kingdom in 31 B.C.
Yet within months of the dictator's assassination in 44 BC Augustus was a serious contender to succeed him, and by defeating Antony and Cleopatra at Actium in 31 BC he became incontestably the most powerful man in the Roman world; his elevated status was confirmed by the title of "Augustus" in AD 27, where historians conventionally place the birth of the empire.
The evidence of the Hellenistic era between Alexander and Actium shows that this kind of political order is actually associated with high levels of innovation.
In common with the latter drama, Shakespeare's play interrogates the connection between controlling the air, imperial conquest, and the fashioning of personal and public legacies: for example, Antony's defeat at Actium conflates the threats to empire posed by foreign queens and storms in the Aeneid when Cleopatra, who has come to embody the Virgilian storm, draws his fleet away from battle.