Active Ion Transport

Active Ion Transport

 

in biology, the migration of ions (sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and others) in living systems through various cellular membranes (for example, nerve and muscle cells, erythrocytes, and others) against a concentration gradient, solubility gradient, electroosmotic gradient, or other gradients, using the energy of metabolic processes accumulated in the system of adenosinephosphoric acids (primarily adenosine triphosphate) and other macroenergetic—that is, energy-rich—compounds. The decay of one molecule of adenosine triphosphate is usually accompanied by transport of two or three nonvalent cations or one bivalent cation. The primary enzyme responsible for converting energy into work that transports ions is adenosine triphosphate, which is concentrated in biological membranes and is activated by the presence of sodium, potassium, and magnesium ions and lipides. One particular case of this enzyme’s action is the energy supply for active ion transport (primarily of sodium ions) through nerve cell membranes.

A. A. BOLDYREV

References in periodicals archive ?
The extensive plasma membrane infoldings associated with mitochondria provide increased surface area and energy for active ion transport.
sup][9] ASL thickness is regulated by active ion transport across epithelial cells.
sup][25] Mucus hydration is set by the volume of liquid present on the airway surfaces, which may be modified by active ion transport processes in both the superficial epithelium and glands.
Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that the third isoform of metallothionein (MT-3), a unique member of metallothionein family is involved in the maintenance of vectorial active ion transport in cultures of human proximal tubule (HPT) cells [2].
Previous work from this laboratory has implicated the expression of the third isoform of metallothionein (MT-3) in the maintenance of proximal tubular vectorial active ion transport as evidenced by the formation of domes.

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