Adam

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Adam

, the first man, in the Bible
Adam (ădˈəm), [Heb.,=man], in the Bible, the first man. In the Book of Genesis, God creates humankind in his image as a species of male and female, giving them dominion over other life. Elsewhere in Genesis, however, Adam is the personal name of the first man for whom the created order is then fashioned. From his body, Eve is made to be his helper and partner. After the Fall, i.e., their disobedience, they are expelled from the Garden of Eden. The Qur'an depicts Adam's creation and fall. These traditions led to the monotheistic ideas regarding sin and grace. For examples of Jewish and Islamic legends about the biblical accounts, see Lilith and Pseudepigrapha. Higher criticism regards chapters 1–4 of Genesis as the re-workings of Babylonian and Canaanite myths concerning creation. While the myths stress human servitude to the gods, Genesis places humankind at the center of the created order, over which it exercises dominion as God's agent.

Adam

, in genetics
Adam, in genetics, popular term for a theoretical male ancestor of all living people; see Eve, in genetics.

Adam

, town, in the Bible
Adam, in the Bible, town on the upper Jordan.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Adam

 

(man in ancient Hebrew), the first man and the father of mankind in Jewish and Christian mythology. According to the Old Testament, god created Adam as the crowning act of the creation of the world. He created Adam in his own image and likeness from the dust of the earth, blew the “breath of life” into his nostrils, and gave him dominion over the earth and over everything that lives on earth. The Koran adopted the myth about Adam, and therefore the Muslims too consider Adam the first man. Many legends and traditions in apocryphal and postbiblical Judaic literature are connected with the name and image of Adam.

M. I. ZAND

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Adam

first man and progenitor of humanity. [O.T.: Genesis 5:1–5]

Adam

in the Bible, the first man. [O.T.: Genesis 1:26–5:5]
See: Firsts

Adam

family retainer; offers Orlando his savings. [Br. Lit.: As You Like It]
See: Loyalty

Adam

condemned to survive by sweat of brow. [O.T.: Genesis 3:19]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Adam

1
1. Adolphe. 1803--56, French composer, best known for his romantic ballet Giselle (1841)
2. Robert. 1728--92, Scottish architect and furniture designer. Assisted by his brother, James, 1730--94, he emulated the harmony of classical and Italian Renaissance architecture
3. in the neoclassical style made popular by Robert Adam

Adam

2
Old Testament the first man, created by God: the progenitor of the human race (Genesis 2--3)

Adam

in the neoclassical style made popular by Robert Adam (1728--92), Scottish architect and furniture designer
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ADAM

A Data Management system
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