Adam style

(redirected from Adamesque)

Adam style

(1728–1792)
An architectural style based on the work of Robert Adam and his brothers, predominantly in England and strongly influential in the United States and elsewhere. It is characterized by a clarity of form, use of color, subtle detailing, and unified schemes of interior design. Basically Neoclassical, it adopted Neo-Gothic, Egyptian, and Etruscan motifs.

Adam style

An architectural style based on the work of Robert Adam (1728–1792) and his brothers, predominant in England in the late 18th century and strongly influential in the US, Russia, and elsewhere. It is characterized by clarity of form, use of color, subtle detailing, and unified schemes of interior design. Basically Neoclassical, it also adapted Neo-Gothic, Egyptian, and Etruscan motifs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brick-built with stone dressings and a slate roof, it has a Venetian window, panelled rooms and an Adamesque (neo-classical) ceiling.
Prall's neoclassical design was Adamesque in style, with pastel colors and fresco paintings combined into a uniform scheme.
Arthur Davies, the distinguished interior designer often used by Cunard, spun a pot pourri of public spaces which included a Carolean smoking room, Palladian lounge, Louis XVI restaurant, Adamesque drawing room, Jacobean grill room and an indoor pool with Egyptian replicas from the British Museum.
Public rooms were detailed in a Louis XIV style, the Palm Room was Adamesque, and the private dining rooms were Jacobean.
When the 1770s staircase (attributed during the Conservation Plan research to John Carr [1723-1807]) (38) began 'leaning' into the landing, workers in 1936 were instructed to carefully dismantle the gallery including plaster enrichments which were to be reused if possible; plasterwork divisions and Adamesque centre ceiling, frieze and cornice evidently were only cleaned and painted; these new discoveries suggest that the entrance hall retained more of its eighteenth-century decor than just the iron and mahogany balustrade staircase, with acanthus theme, than had earlier been thought.
George Richardson's A Book of Ceilings, the first plates of which were completed in 1776, is an oft-quoted and fertile source for Adamesque designs in Ireland, and Lucey identifies Stapleton's recognisable borrowings.
Constructed in 1920 by Edgar and Arch Selwyn, the theater was designed in the Adamesque style by architects de Rosa and Periera featuring a limestone facade and open colonnade.
The craftsmanship of the Adamesque panelling and Rococo plasterwork are still in place, fused in with the Edwardian mod cons of big handbasins in bedroom alcoves.
His choice of old oak in the hall and the almost Adamesque furnishings of the public rooms may have been intended to complement this history, although the house was actually rebuilt around 1734 and the public rooms are Regency of around 1820.
Being brought up at the toy-fort-like Glin Castle on the River Shannon in south-west Ireland, I greatly appreciated its delicate Adamesque interiors but even then at an early age realised that it had very little good furniture.