acquired immunity

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Related to Adaptive immune system: Innate immune system

acquired immunity

[ə′kwīrd ə′myün·ə·dē]
(immunology)
Resistance to a microbial or other antigenic substance taken on by a naturally susceptible individual; may be either active or passive.
References in periodicals archive ?
IgG is a "memory" antibody; it is normal for the adaptive immune system to make IgG antibodies to foreign proteins, and IgG antibodies to a food is a sign of a normal adaptive immune system.
The expanded glossary below presents the main features of and mechanisms and players in the innate and adaptive immune systems that are relevant to this special issue of Alcohol Research: Current Reviews.
However, the common scenario for severe allergic reactions are those mediated by the antibody IgE in conjunction with mast cells and basophils, following activation of both the innate and adaptive immune systems.
Thus, the adaptive immune system, unlike the innate immune system, protects against reinfection.
The protein complement system works in a very different and more immediate manner than the adaptive immune system.
As plants lack an adaptive immune system, recognition and signalling in the cells directly exposed to pathogens is vital for plant defence and survival, and thus agricultural yields.
The vaccine primes a type of white blood cell, part of the body's adaptive immune system, to seek out and destroy cells with the mammaglobin-A protein.
Washington, May 3 ( ANI ): Researchers have discovered the mechanism used by the Ebola virus to disarm the adaptive immune system.
Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is involved in the development of the adaptive immune system and has been recognized as being important in the function of additional cell types, including platelets, phagocytes, fibroblasts, and osteoclasts, and in the generation of the inflammasome.
The fact that there is no adaptive immune system (antibody-producing B cells or T cell-mediated immunity) in this variety of mice gives evidence to the theory that hepatocyte damage is triggered by the innate immune system's response to the HCV.
The problem with the adaptive immune system is that the first time it encounters a new antigen it can take several days to get up to speed once it encounters a new antigen.
As every physician should know, an infant is born with a very weak, unchallenged adaptive immune system.

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