addiction

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addiction:

see drug addiction and drug abusedrug addiction and drug abuse,
chronic or habitual use of any chemical substance to alter states of body or mind for other than medically warranted purposes. Traditional definitions of addiction, with their criteria of physical dependence and withdrawal (and often an underlying
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.

addiction

see DRUG ADDICTION.

addiction

[ə′dik·shən]
(medicine)
Habituation to a specific practice, such as drinking alcoholic beverages or using drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
G&G Holistic Addiction Treatment is successful because respect and compassion are at the foundation of everything we do," said Raufman.
Symptoms verified in chemical addiction, such as tolerance and withdrawal, are not yet validated for sexual addiction.
The Addictions Academy provides elite certification for those seeking career credentials.
The ninth chapter is about addiction and infectious diseases such as hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases.
Our research also indicates that women are more at risk of developing Facebook addiction, probably due to the social nature of Facebook, Andreassen noted.
Addiction is characterized by an inability to consistently abstain, impairment in behavioral control, craving, diminished recognition of significant problems with one's behaviors and interpersonal relationships, and a dysfunctional emotional response.
Begin by sharing with students the definition below of drug addiction, taken from the article "Drug Addiction Is a Disease: Why the Teen Brain Is Vulnerable," www.
Staying up for 100-plus hours while having fun' eventually yields an addiction that will remain with you forever.
These people believe they are treating medical conditions, not feeding their addiction.
Criminologist Raymond Corrado expects Simon Fraser University will play a prominent role in a new $10 million research centre that will focus on addiction.
As with other addictions, work is the "fix," the drug that frees the workaholic from experiencing the emotional pain of the anger, hurt, guilt, and fear in the other areas of the workaholic's life.
It has "this nasty side effect of causing addiction if used inappropriately," says neuroscientist Anthony Basile, who recently moved from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md.

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