adding machine

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adding machine:

see calculatorcalculator
or calculating machine,
device for performing numerical computations; it may be mechanical, electromechanical, or electronic. The electronic computer is also a calculator but performs other functions as well.
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adding machine

[′ad·iŋ mə‚shēn]
(computer science)
A device which performs the arithmetical operation of addition and subtraction.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Dalton adding machine was one of the most successful and best-known adding machines.
This early adding machine represents a major shift in the profession.
The loose-leaf system allowed the greater use of adding machines as several accounts could be totaled at the same time, significantly reducing the time required to close accounts.
For example, shortly before the turn of the century, the New York Central Railroad installed several tabulating machines, each with four attached adding machines.
If a taxpayer is storing assets, such as the adding machines in Example 2, for which the taxpayer most likely does not have a current or future use, the taxpayer should contribute the assets to a non-profit organization or otherwise dispose of the assets to eliminate future personal property tax liabilities.
The only equipment I needed was a typewriter, an adding machine and a calculator, which was worthless to check anything because it didn't have a printer.
Nahon recalls being outfitted with a desk, a chair and an adding machine.
The collection already contains some turn-of-the-century adding machines, business clocks from the 1880s and the "star" item, an accounting ledger dating back to 1873.
PHOTO : Lois Green (left), a donor to the museum, and Pam Iovino discuss a 1930 adding machine in the accounting museum.
The same was true of the computer in the 1960s as it began to displace adding machines, punch cards, and electro-mechanical calculators.
resounds with the noise of pencils breaking and adding machines being thrown across the room.
These include kraft paper, multiwall sacks with glued and stitched bottoms, and office products such as reams and business forms; school supplies, notebooks, envelopes, paper rolls for adding machines, lined notepads and folders; tissue paper, napkins, facial and kitchen towels.