Adelaide

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Adelaide

, empress consort of Holy Roman Emperor Otto I
Adelaide (ădˈəlād) or Adelheid (äˈdĕlhīt), c.931–999, empress consort of Holy Roman Emperor Otto I, daughter of King Rudolf II of Arles. After the death (950) of her first husband, King Lothair of Italy, she was about to be forced into a marriage with the son of Berengar II, Lothair's successor. She appealed to Otto I, who rescued and married her in 951. After living in Lombardy (985–991), she returned to Germany to serve as sole regent for her grandson, Otto III, from 991 to 994. She was also known as a great benefactor of religious houses.

Adelaide

, city, Australia

Adelaide, city (2020 pop. 26,177, Greater Adelaide 2020 pop. 1,376,601,), capital and chief port of South Australia, S Australia, at the mouth of the Torrens River on Gulf St. Vincent. It has automotive, textile, and other industries. Grains, wool, dairy products, wine, and fruit are exported. In the face of declining manufacturing—the area was once a major automobile manufacturing center—service industries have become more important.

Named for the consort of William IV, it was founded in 1836 and is the oldest city in the state. It was the first city in Australia to be incorporated (1840) and developed according to the original city plan of Colonel William Light. The Univ. of Adelaide (1874) and the multicampus South Australian College of Advanced Education (1982) are among the institutions of higher education located in the city and its suburbs. There are also a botanic garden and art, history, natural history, and other museums. The Adelaide Festival of the Arts has been held biennially since 1960.

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Adelaide

the capital of South Australia: Port Adelaide, 11 km (7 miles) away on St. Vincent Gulf, handles the bulk of exports. Pop.: 1 002 127 (2001)
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