Dependovirus

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Dependovirus

[di′pen·də‚vī·rəs]
(virology)
A genus of the animal-virus family Parvoviridae that is characterized by defective viruses that require a helper virus (usually an adenovirus) for their replication.
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He and his associates have focused on the relatively nonpathogenic adeno-associated virus.
Protective effect of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2/8-mediated gene therapy from the maternal hyperphenylalaninemia in offsprings of a mouse model of phenylketonuria.
There is a major difference between adeno-associated virus vectors and adenovirus vectors,' he says.
Phase I trial results using an adeno-associated virus injected into muscle to provide factor IX provide hope for patients with this disease.
AGTC's potential treatment uses an adeno-associated virus (AAV), a safe, man-made virus that delivers healthy copies of the ACHM gene to the cells of the retina, replacing the defective copies of the gene.
One of the major limitations to extend this clinical success to other blinding ditions is that many are caused by mutations in genes with large coding sequences that exceed the cargo capacity of the most efficient gene transfer vector for PR, the adeno-associated virus (AAV).
for the development and potential commercialization of SPK-FIX, a development program advancing proprietary, bio-engineered adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for the potential treatment of hemophilia B.
Wilson, MD, PhD, demonstrated that a single dose of an adeno-associated virus (V) expressing a broadly neutralizing flu antibody into the nasal passages of mice and ferrets gives them complete protection and substantial reductions in flu replication when exposed to lethal strains of H5N1 and H1N1 flu virus.
Targeted Genetics Corporation (Seattle, WA) announced the issuance of another patent related to the company's leading adeno-associated virus (AAV) technology platform.
Preliminary evidence indicates that the adeno-associated virus (AAV) used to deliver the gene therapy was not to blame for the tumors, said lead investigator Mark Sands, MD of the Washington University School of Medicine in St.
All three studies use recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), a genetically engineered virus incapable of replicating but able to deliver a selected gene.
AGTC's potential treatment uses an adeno-associated virus (AAV) -- a safe, manmade virus -- that delivers healthy copies of the XLRS gene to the cells of the retina, replacing the defective copies of the gene.