lapse rate

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lapse rate

[′laps ‚rāt]
(meteorology)
The rate of decrease of temperature in the atmosphere with height.
Sometimes, the rate of change of any meteorological element with height.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lapse rate

The rate of decrease of an atmospheric variable with height. However, the term normally refers to the fall of temperature with height. The three types of lapse rates referred to in meteorology are dry adiabatic lapse rate, saturated adiabatic lapse rate, and environmental lapse rate. See also dry adiabatic lapse rate, saturated adiabatic lapse rate, and environmental lapse rate.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Marquet, 2012: Moist-entropic vertical adiabatic lapse rates: The standard cases and some lead towards inhomogeneous conditions.
In addition to the dry adiabatic lapse rate used in question 9, there is the wet adiabatic lapse rate for saturated air, which cools at a rate of about 2 degrees C per 1,000ft.
During the afternoon it's common for the environmental lapse rate to approach the dry adiabatic lapse rate (DALR) in the first few thousand feet of the surface (left).
This excerpt below is a good example of a fairly deep, saturated layer that is approaching the moist adiabatic lapse rate (MALR).
As unsaturated air ascends, it expands and cools at the dry adiabatic lapse rate (DALR), which is three degrees C for every 1000 feet gain in altitude.
The lapse rate above and below these altitudes suggest the potential for turbulence due to a nearly dry adiabatic lapse rate (3 degrees per 1,000 feet).

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