Adirondack Mountains

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Adirondack Mountains

(ăd'ərŏn`dăk), mountain mass, NE N.Y., between the St. Lawrence valley in the north and the Mohawk valley in the south; rising to 5,344 ft (1,629 m) at Mt. Marcy, the highest point in the state. Geologically a southern extension of the Canadian ShieldCanadian Shield
or Laurentian Plateau
, U-shaped region of ancient rock, the nucleus of North America, stretching N from the Great Lakes to the Arctic Ocean. Covering more than half of Canada, it also includes most of Greenland and extends into the United States as the
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, the Adirondacks are sometimes mistakenly included in the Appalachian system. Chiefly metamorphic in composition, they were formed as granite and other rocks intruded upward, doming the earth's surface; later faulting and surface erosion, particularly by glaciers, resulted in a rugged topography, with 46 peaks over 4,000 ft (1,220 m), scenic gorges, waterfalls, streams, and ponds. In the 1980s many Adirondack lakes were found to be unable to support life because of acid rain pollution. The Hudson, Ausable, and Black rivers rise in the Adirondacks. The region contains many resorts, including the famous "great camps"; most of it has been set aside as Adirondack Park, the largest (9,375 sq mi/24,281 sq km, roughly 40% public and 60% private land) U.S. park outside Alaska. Lake Placid and Lake George are major centers. After intensive 19th-century lumbering, the industry has gradually declined. Mines in the Adirondacks have produced iron ore, titanium, vanadium, and talc. The Adirondack Museum, in Blue Mountain Lake, and the Wild Center–Natural History Museum of the Adirondacks, in Tupper Lake, focus on the human and natural histories of the region, respectively.
References in periodicals archive ?
Left: Miniature Adirondack Pack Basket by Jack Leadley, 1990.
The Adirondack quilt study turned up several of what Barbara Brackman calls "utility quilts," the most basic of pieced comforters "characterized by simple patchwork patterns, coarse fabrics, batting of thick cotton or wool." (15) The Adirondack examples are made in simple patterns (such as One Patch) and often called "camp quilts." (16) A "camp" in the region can be anything from a tent on the ground to a grand mansion with many outbuildings, but "camp quilts" are most often found in the modest lakeshore cottages that proliferated as middle-class families began to visit the Adirondacks in their own automobiles in the 1920s.
The Heroine's no-nonsense attitude and good instincts move the story along at a fast pace, while Louise Gaylord's descriptions of the summer retreat evoke the unique charm of the Adirondacks. Dark Lake keeps readers guessing with its gallery of questionable characters, snobbish neighbors, and troubled family members, while the disturbing trend of meth addiction and production adds a realistic undercurrent to the mystery.
In the late 1800s, the Adirondacks were a hefty source of lumber for growing American cities.
Although Adventures in the Wilderness; or, Camp-Life in the Adirondacks (1869) by William Henry Harrison Murray (1840-1904) is seldom approached by literary scholars today, its influence on American thought and leisure at the time of its publication raises a myriad of issues that reach beyond environmental considerations.
US wireless communications holding company AT&T (NYSE:T) has activated three new mobile broadband cell sites in the Adirondacks, the company announced on Monday.
US wireless communications company Verizon Wireless has activated 18 new cell sites in the Adirondacks region in 2009.
Foster provides a new edition of artist Harold Weston's (1894-1972) autobiography of his time spent in the Adirondacks. The volume combines stories about the history of the wilderness with his painting and life.
Called the Wild Center, the museum is a 35,000 s/f facility that showcases the natural environment and resources of the Adirondacks Park.
Jenkins (Wildlife Conservation Society) chronicles the deposition of acids and mercury from fossil fuel combustion onto the Adirondack Mountains region, and how researchers measured the acid rain and traced it ecological effects.
The geographical aspect of working at the remote site in the Adirondacks was somewhat of a logistical issue for Sabre, due to the fact that all the steel on the site needed to be cut down to prepared five-foot-long pieces and then transported off the property to steel mills for re-milling.