adjuvant

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Related to Adjuvant therapy: Adjuvant chemotherapy

adjuvant

[′aj·ə·vənt]
(pharmacology)
A material that enhances the action of a drug or antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
The impact of repeated surgery and adjuvant therapy on survival for patients with recurrent glioblastoma.
The purpose of adjuvant therapy is to reduce the risk of recurrence following surgical removal of the tumor and lymph nodes that contain cancer.
Should some of these novel agents prove safe and effective as adjuvant therapy, SLNB results will determine the need for such therapy based upon individualized patient prognosis.
Despite the documented health benefits and recommendations, receipt of adjuvant therapy varies by several nonclinical factors such as race, health insurance, socioeconomic status (SES), and treatment facility characteristics (Griggs et al.
lower abdomen), adjacent organ resection (yes or no), adjuvant therapy (yes or no), ascites (yes or no), and postoperative metastasis (yes or no).
Studies examining the influence of relative dose intensity (RDI) of adjuvant therapy on RFS in patients with colon cancer treated with 5FU/LV showed no effect of increased duration of therapy on recurrence-free survival (RFS) [17,18].
In our study, a 5-year survival of 60% for the adjuvant therapy group was significantly higher than the group that received neoadjuvant therapy and was also higher than the group that received surgery alone, 33% and 30%, respectively.
All patients underwent surgical treatment with or without adjuvant therapy.
6% of the women who received any adjuvant therapy in 2000 to 22.
Radiation oncologists are bullish on the role of adjuvant therapy for patients with PSMs after radical prostatectomy.
Twenty-nine (83%) patients were treated with a combination of systemic corticosteroids and adjuvant therapy (defined as one or more of the following: mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, dapsone, tetracyclines, methotrexate, rituximab, and intravenous immunoglobulin).
A major challenge in breast cancer treatment is to identify the subgroups of patients who will benefit from a particular adjuvant therapy regimen, with the goal of providing the right treatment based on the patient's underlying tumor biology.