Admetos

Admetos

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Admetos is one of the eight hypothetical planets (sometimes referred to as the trans-Neptunian points or planets, or TNPs for short) utilized in Uranian astrology. The Uranian system, sometimes referred to as the Hamburg School of Astrology, was established by Friedrich Sieggrün (1877–1951) and Alfred Witte (1878–1943). It relies heavily on hard aspects and midpoints. In decline for many decades, it has experienced a revival in recent years.

Admetos may symbolize blockage, patience, frustration, delay, hindrances, standstill, and so forth. More positively, it may represent depth, profundity, and that which is fundamental. For example, a link between the planet Mercury and Admetos may indicate limited thinking, or it may indicate deep thinking.

Based on the speculative orbits of the Uranian planets, the Kepler, Solar Fire and Win*Star software program will all locate this hypothetical planet in an astrological chart.

Sources:

Lang-Wescott, Martha. Mechanics of the Future: Asteroids. Rev. ed. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1991.
Simms, Maria Kay. Dial Detective: Investigation with the 90 Degree Dial. San Diego: Astro Computing Services, 1989.
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to Admetos and Alkestis, celebrating their great love and Metilla's
(1960) "Alkestis und Admetos. Versuch einer Euripidesinterpretation", Gymnasium 67: 517-533.
And these, the God so tamed, with golden tongue, That, in the plenitude of youth and power, Admetos vowed himself to rule thenceforth In Pherai solely for his people's sake, Subduing to such end each lust and greed That dominates the natural charity.
See Admetos and his father, Pheres, who, having refused to die for his son, has been written off by him, in a scene that is equally uproarious and somber:
premiere at Jacob's Pillow in July, movement was as evocative as words in telling the story of King Admetos, who evades his own death by allowing his wife (Alkestis) to die in his place, only to be haunted by the repercussions of that choice.
by far first rose up [??] the lord of men Eumelos Admetos' own son [??] he was excellent at horsemanship and after him [??] Tydeus' son rose up [??] strong Diomedes and he harnessed Trojan horses [??] he once seized them from Aineias [??] though the man himself was rescued by Apollo.
We have become like the parents of Admetos in Euripides' Alcestis-- "walking cadavers," unwilling to give up the few remaining days (in Europe's case, of its peace dividend) even if only by doing so can any generational future be assured.
In this tragicomedy, Admetos, king of Pherai, is informed by Death that he must accompany him to the underworld.
After Pheres has refused to die to save his son, Admetos unleashes a stream of invective against his father.
Alcestis is a queen 'unique amongst wives' whose beloved husband, Admetos, is destined by the gods to die.
Francis Turner Palgrave, retelling a version of Alcestis, had Admetos cry, on seeing Alcestis miraculously returned, "'Mine, / My one of all the world!
We have become like the parents of Admetos in Euripides' Alcestis--"walking cadavers," unwilling to give up the few remaining days (in Europe's case, of its peace dividend) even if only by doing so can any generational future be assured.