Admetus


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Admetus

(ădmē`təs): see AlcestisAlcestis
, in Greek mythology, daughter of Pelias. She was won in marriage by Admetus, who fulfilled her father's condition that her suitor come for her in a chariot pulled by a wild boar and a lion.
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Admetus

granted everlasting life when wife Alcestis dies in his place. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 54]
References in periodicals archive ?
But if Stevenson was attracted to any model that promised release from service to Admetus, he was not so happy with Thoreau's model of frugal asceticism, which did not suit him in the least.
are veiled; both Admetus and Chaereas are mourning; both are pushed by a
(1898) "The Admetus of Euripides viewed in relation to the Admetus of tradition", TAPhA 29: 65-85.
Alcestis is more in control of her emotions than is her husband, Admetus, in this scene; she accepts reality, urging him to see her situation as it is ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 280).
Leighton elected to depict the wrestling-match between Death and Heracles, and to introduce the dead Alcestis, Admetus, Pheres, and the maidens into the same scene, decisions that distort Euripides' play, which, as Greek dramaturgy required, keeps the fight offstage.
All this before Lazarus published Admetus, let alone Songs of a Semite.
Apollo famously tended cattle in Pieria, which was stolen by the infant Hermes (Homeric hymn to Hermes); the Iliad (21.450-452) mentions that Zeus commanded Apollo to guard the cattle of Laomedon and especially the story of Apollo tending the flocks of Admetus at Pherae on the banks of the river Amphrysus in Thessaly becomes more prominent in later writers.
This tableau is followed by a depiction of Apollo guarding Admetus' herds and Mercury stealing one of the cows.
In Alcestis, we see how Admetus cannily pushes his wife to die in his stead though she is later brought back to life on her way to Hades.
I was walking along the road towards Athens with Admetus one day last summer.
The editor refers here to Hyginus, 49 and explains that Apollo became friends with Admetus and helped him to obtain Alcestis's love.
Another, better possibility may be Admetus's lament in Euripides's Alcestis 942-43, 'To whom shall I speak, by whom shall I be spoken to, that I might have a pleasant homecoming?' (21) But this connection, too, is only tangential.