admiral

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admiral

any of various nymphalid butterflies, esp the red admiral or white admiral
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Admiral

 

(from Arabic amir al bahr, “ruler on the sea”), a navy rank. It was first used in Europe in the 12th century in Venice and Genoa and later spread to the navies of other countries. In Russia admiral ranks (admiral general, admiral, vice admiral, and rear admiral) were introduced by Peter I in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. The May 7, 1940, decree of the Presidium of the USSR Supreme Soviet created the following ranks in the USSR Navy: rear admiral, vice admiral, admiral, and admiral of the fleet; and in the navy engineering corps, engineer rear admiral, engineer vice admiral, and engineer admiral. On March 3, 1955, the rank of admiral of the fleet of the Soviet Union replaced the rank of admiral of the fleet, and on April 18, 1962, the rank of admiral of the fleet was reintroduced and added to all those existing.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
This look had escaped Buckingham, who had eyes for nothing but Norfolk, of whom he was evidently very jealous; he seemed anxious to remove the princesses from the deck of a vessel where the admiral reigned supreme.
"And I, my lord," retorted the admiral, "I appeal to my own conscience, and to my own sense of responsibility.
Mr Shepherd was eloquent on the subject; pointing out all the circumstances of the Admiral's family, which made him peculiarly desirable as a tenant.
"And a very well-spoken, genteel, shrewd lady, she seemed to be," continued he; "asked more questions about the house, and terms, and taxes, than the Admiral himself, and seemed more conversant with business; and moreover, Sir Walter, I found she was not quite unconnected in this country, any more than her husband; that is to say, she is sister to a gentleman who did live amongst us once; she told me so herself: sister to the gentleman who lived a few years back at Monkford.
What would you have them do then, Admiral? Sit down and starve?"
The Admiral jumped out of his chair with an evil word in his throat.
The Admiral pooh-poohed it at first as a piece of necessary but annoying garden work; but at length the ring of real energy came back into his laughter, and he cried with a mixture of impatience and good humour:
Admiral Pendragon looked very much astonished, though not particularly annoyed; while Fanshaw was so amused with what looked like a performing pigmy on his little stand, that he could not control his laughter.
Make it a condition, in your letter to the admiral, that if Mr.
You may say: Suppose this condition is sufficient to answer the purpose, why hide it in a private letter to the admiral? Why not openly write it down, with my cousin's name, in the will?
"Last night's raid ought to wake a few of them up," the Admiral grunted.
The Admiral has his faults, but he is a very good man, and has been more than a father to me.