Adrastea


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Related to Adrastea: Chaldene, Callirrhoe

Adrastea

(ädrəstē`ə), in astronomy, one of the 39 known moons, or natural satellites, of JupiterJupiter
, in astronomy, 5th planet from the sun and largest planet of the solar system. Astronomical and Physical Characteristics

Jupiter's orbit lies beyond the asteroid belt at a mean distance of 483.6 million mi (778.
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.

Adrastea

(ă-dras -tee-ă) A small irregularly shaped satellite of Jupiter, one of the planet's inner group of satellites, discovered in 1979. See Jupiter's satellites; Table 2, backmatter.

Adrastea

[ə′dras·tē·ə]
(astronomy)
A small satellite of Jupiter, having an orbital radius of 80,140 miles (128,980 kilometers) and radial dimensions of 7, 6, and 5 miles (12, 10, and 8 kilometers). Also known as Jupiter XV.

Adrastea

goddess of inevitable fate. [Gk. Myth.: Jobes, 35]
See: Fate
References in periodicals archive ?
General morphology of ovipositor and membranous valves similar to those of Ellipteroides (Protogonomyia) adrastea Stary & Mendl, 1984, from which it differs by female cercus longer than tergite 10, distally thinner and upturned, and with blunt tip.
Repertorios: ADRASTEA -- REBIUN -- CCPB000033573-8 -- Gomez-Senent Martinez 968 -- Maffei-Rua 4829 -- Ruiz Perez 4.
Repertorios: ADRASTEA -- CCPB000051261-3 -- Palau 258832 -- Ruiz Perez 92 -- Simon Diaz, Regional 1519 -- Simon Diaz, Siglo XVII 1611.
Adrastea and Metis orbit Jupiter almost exactly in the equatorial plane.
The correct order of the moons: 1) Metis 2) Adrastea 3) Amalthea 4) Thebe 5) Io 6) Europa 7) Ganymede 8) Callisto.
Interestingly this angular shift can be explained with the same order of magnitude from the viewpoint of Q-satellite angular shift (see Table 1), in particular for Jupiter's Adrastea (10.
Pero vamos, de buena manera cumpleme este asunto que te digo; y te daria ese hermosisimo juguete de Zeus que le hizo la querida nodriza Adrastea en la caverna del Ida, cuando todavia era nino.
Dynamicists believe the main ring, about 6,000 km wide, contains particles of various sizes being ground off the moonlets Metis and Adrastea.
moons Metis 60 x 34 km Adrastea 20 x 14 km Amalthea 250 x 128 km Thebe 116 x 84 km Io 3,642 km Europa 3,130 km Ganymede 5,268 km Callisto 4,806 km Leda 10 km Himalia 170 km Lysithea 24 km Elara 80 km Ananke 20 km Carme 30 km Pasiphae 36 km Sinope 28 km