hypoadrenia

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hypoadrenia

[‚hī·pō·ə′drē·nē·ə]
(medicine)
Reduced functioning of the adrenal glands. Also known as hypoadrenalism.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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(13) A patient may present with adrenal fatigue or weird facial or muscle tics, unusual skin sensations, and periods of feeling okay and other times struggling to get out of bed.
Claim: "When your adrenal glands are overtaxed, a condition known as adrenal fatigue or adrenal exhaustion sets in, which in turn can set a cascade of disease processes into motion," claims Joseph Mercola on his website, mercola.com.
A whopping 60 percent of the Filipino workforce is aging prematurely in more ways than one--shown through exhaustion, adrenal fatigue, imbalanced energy levels, skin and facial aging, less productivity, and the inability to do things you once enjoyed, or should enjoy, for that matter.
THE PUBLIC is outraged (well, nothing new there; people seem to thrive on outrage, adrenal fatigue be damned).
Many are diagnosed with some degree of adrenal fatigue.
Chronic stress can bring about adrenal fatigue. If the adrenal gland is overexerted repeatedly for too long, it becomes unable to produce and release epinephrine and norepinephrine.
Adrenal fatigue, according to several online (mainly non-medical) publications, is a little-known condition that doctors dismiss.
Natural and alternative health practitioners have adopted the term adrenal fatigue to describe the collection of symptoms frequently experienced by people suffering from stress-induced exhaustion.
Chronic exposure to high stress can result in adrenal fatigue, and this could be an additional possible explanation.
Adrenal fatigue is the idea that the adrenal glands, which are located on top of each kidney and produce the hormones Cortisol and adrenaline, among others, "exhaust," thus impacting hormone production and causing fatigue.
One more note: If you have serious adrenal fatigue (which I've written about extensively in previous issues, which are available on my website), you should not take pregnenolone supplements without the guidance of a physician knowledgeable about bio-identical hormones.
Countering the online health gurus is especially difficult when they offer the irresistible cocktail of medical language muddled with a much more pleasing aesthetic than medicine, far from the clinical world of linoleum and antiseptic, a better place where patients' conditions are diagnosed with metaphors ("adrenal fatigue") and treated with poetry (holy basil, bone broth, Himalayan sea salt).