Adstratum

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Adstratum

 

a variety of bilingualism resulting from the prolonged existence of two languages in the same territory. An adstratum arises from the effect which the language of the newcomers has on that of the native population; the former is at first preserved in the capacity of a neighbor language. Linguistic changes associated with adstratum transcend the mere borrowing of individual words and concern the very structure of the language (phonetic, grammatical, lexical). As a result of adstratum, linguistic signs common to genetically unrelated languages may appear.

V. V. RASKIN

References in periodicals archive ?
34) takes Hock (1986) to task for "erroneously" stating that adstratal relationships are most conducive to borrowing of basic vocabulary (see also Lutz 2013), but does not provide evidence or argumentation against such a statement.
Wexler knew his argument would make people mad: "I am aware that discussions of ethnic reconstruction and the origins of religious and superstitious practices often provoke emotional reactions; this is especially true when traditional views are being challenged." The reception to his argument by Yiddish, Germanic, and Slavic linguists, on the contrary, was, or at least seemed, quite dispassionate, framed in the jargon of the trade (discussions of dialectology, isoglosses, substratal and adstratal components, diphthongization, and such).
This contact led to reinforcing the already existing analytizing tendencies of Brittonic English and also led to adding new grammatical transfer features from Norse through superstratal and adstratal contact.