Aedes

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Aedes

[ā′ē·dēz]
(invertebrate zoology)
A genus of the dipterous subfamily Culicinae in the family Culicidae, with species that are vectors for many diseases of humans.

aedes

1. In Roman antiquity, any edifice or a minor shrine, not formally consecrated.
2. Now, any chapel or temple.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our results suggest that there are additional chemical compound candidates that could be commercialised to attract mosquitoes, particularly Aedes aegypti.
Convergent habitat segregation of Aedes aegypti and Aedesalbopictus (Dip-tera: Culicidae) in southeastern Brazil and Florida.
This includes a grant of up to 218,598 towards a collaborative research and development programme in India to control and effectively eradicate the Aedes aegypti mosquito from 2 rural hamlets where this mosquito is prevalent.
Vertical transmission of Zika virus in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.
Since 2011, the species of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes have been identified in several cities in the U.
For instance, Louisiana has partnered with CDC and eight other states also home to Aedes aegypti to develop response plans and share lessons learned.
The Aedes aegypti is a small mosquito that is especially difficult to avoid because it is a silent flyer, well adapted to the urban environment, and largely found indoors," says Dr.
Almost 3,500 different mosquito species populate the planet, and 170 of them live in Florida, including Aedes aegypti, which terrorized the state long before Zika.
2015 have reported an appreciable active role on the fatal effects on the mosquito larvae from the commercial botanical extract of Lantana camara aculeate against many species of mosquitoes including Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Culex quafasciatus.
In the context of vector borne diseases, the mechanical translocation and subsequent adaptation of vectors between endemic and non-endemic areas is a common phenomenon that can lead to the introduction of infection; for example, it is well documented that the mosquito Aedes aegypti, vector of Yellow fever, Dengue, Chicungunya and Zika viruses was shipped by steamers along the Magdalena River from Cartagena in the 1880s (1).