Aedicule


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Aedicule

A canopied niche flanked by colonnettes, intended as a shelter for a statue or a shrine; a door or window framed by columns or pilasters and crowned with a pediment.
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But several occasions exist in fourteenth-century Italian monumental art where an arcuated aedicule must be interpreted in a fully three-fold manner, as marking a tomb, an altar, and a throne simultaneously.
I have therefore focussed, in some detail, on the theoretical aspects treated in the book--the aedicule and its emanatory movement--and left comments on the author's temple categories, ornamental terminologies, and dating to architectural historians.
A sculpture, a large statue of Hermes, was built into its own recessed aedicule above the door; that's the nose.
But the key element for the present discussion is the tall Gothic aedicule (here, as often subsequently, with inscribed trefoil), the earliest surviving representative of another fundamental component of the late-medieval wall-tomb in Italy.
Within this grand, airy volume, a folded concrete canopy marks the precise, even ceremonial point-of-access; the soffit of this contemporary aedicule is lined by the bottom flanges of steel beams and is inset with grids of glass block.
Considered as a whole, the Shepherds' Monument is an unsatisfactory composition of poorly integrated parts, consisting of a Greek Doric aedicule, almost certainly by James 'Athenian' Stuart; a rustic stone arch imitating rough-hewn wood, adapted from a design by Thomas Wright for an 'Arbour of the Cave or Cabin Kind'; and Scheemakers's relief in a marble frame designed by Smart, set on a classical pedestal containing the tablet of cryptic letters.
In the middle is a small glass aedicule containing the pool for water-play.
In 1731 it was decided that oval niches for busts would be put on either side of each aedicule, and after 1780 these began to be filled with busts of artists not buried in the church.
The central aedicule in the pediment was to have taken one of the fifty statues of Queen Anne ordered by the commission, but cancelled on 29 June 1714 (not, as here, after the queen's death), in favour of a single statue in the Strand.
civil works for B14, from L2 walls up to Roof 1 (R1) slab and Roof 2 (R2) aedicules including reinforced concrete works, embedded items, structural repairs, earthing and lightning, temporary protection of internal openings and temporary waterproofing, rainwater drainage and closure of external openings, weather tightness on temporary basis.
Emma Wood and Lizzie Smith's brilliant idea was inspired by a combination of folding religious icons and Brutalist architecture: stiff cardboard panels have been joined by hinges to create little aedicules, forming hollowed out spaces that invite the viewer to peer inside.
Instead of columns they paint fluted stems with oddly shaped leaves and volutes, and instead of pediments arabesques, the same with candelabra and painted aedicules, on the pediments of which grow dainty flowers unrolling out of roots and topped without rhyme or reason, by figurines.