Aeëtes

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Related to Aeetes: Colchis, Medea, Apsyrtus

Aeëtes

(ē-ē`tēz): see JasonJason,
in Greek mythology, son of Aeson. When Pelias usurped the throne of Iolcus and killed (or imprisoned) Aeson and most of his descendants, Jason was smuggled off to the centaur Chiron, who reared him secretly on Mt. Pelion.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(49) Jason thereby implies that Medea exerted little personal agency in advancing his strategic agenda and therefore made no praiseworthy contribution to his acquisition of Aeetes' fleece and his attempt to secure political ascendancy in Iolchus.
After Jason agrees to meet the challenge posed by Aeetes, Medea's mind is compared to a dream in the way it flutters after Jason (446-47).
In Colchis, his final appearance in the poem,(49) there is no indication that he speaks at all; there again only the result--the transfer of the dragon's teeth from Aeetes to Jason--is told.
In another, Aeetes describes his two brazen-footed bulls, "mouths gusting gouts of flame;' but when Jason tells his companions about the beasts, he doesn't quite get it right: "two brazen footed bulls, mouths gouting gusts of flame." Medea's "virgin heart" beats "a tattoo on her ribs"; after a sojourn through the desert, a hero emerges from drinking, "his lips all wet slobbered"; and when Polydeukes scores a knockout punch, his opponent's teeth are "slamdashed" to the ground, as they would be in a Superman comic book.
The king in the second part of the story is not a frightening or vengeful character bent on eliminating or testing the hero or prophet, as are Pelias, Aeetes, or even Jezebel in Elijah's story.
After many adventures, the Argonauts finally reached Colchis, where they found that the king, Aetes (Aeetes), would not give up the fleece until Jason performed several tasks.
Aeetes, king of Colchis, who agrees to give up the Golden Fleece if Jason can accomplish deeds beyond mortal skill and strength.
Phrixus reached Colchis at the eastern end of the Black Sea; he gave the ram to King Aeetes, who nailed its fleece to an oak in the grove of Ares, and married Aeetes ' daughter Chalciope, who bore him four sons.
Colchian King Aeetes kept the Fleece in his possession.
28-9), since her father Aeetes is Pasiphae's brother (Apollonius of Rhodes, Arg.
When they finally reached their destination, they were forced to perform several additional tasks, but Aetes (Aeetes), the king, still refused to give up the fleece.
In the seventh book, Aeetes bitterly summarises the Argonautic expedition in terms that look forward to the eventual fall of Asia to Greece: