Aelian


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Aelian

(ē`lēən), fl. 2d cent. A.D., Greek rhetorician, b. Praenesta; his original name was Claudius Aelianus. He taught rhetoric in Rome c.220. His works, all in Greek, include Historical Miscellanies, stories of supernatural occurrences throughout history; and On the Characteristics of Animals. Both of these are largely extant. He also wrote Peasant Letters, 20 fictitious letters from farmers from Attica.
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Authors both major and minor are treated (e.g., Aelian's Varia Historia and Ammianus's Roman history), alongside the artistic depictions of Darius and Alexander (notably the celebrated Naples mosaic).
(50) While in the library Ferguson pulls a book from the shelf, Aelian's Nature of Animals, and while it is a book of which he has no prior knowledge, he discovers that the text appears 'to have existed before I look at it' at the same time that it is only 'another dream'.(51)' Aelian's existence can be known only through his words, but these words themselves have no simple relation to reality.
29, Aelian, Alciphron's Letters, and Aristainetos' allusions to Aristophanes' Clouds in Letters 2.3 and 2.12.
The name means Aelian Bridge, with Aelian being the family name of the Emperor Hadrian.
This information needs to be corrected on the basis of Strabo's more probable estimate that the trip only lasted six to seven days (17.815) and supplemented with the information that these mines were protected by Roman guards in the second / third century (Aelian 7.18, Ptol.
FOBES, The Letters of Alciphron, Aelian and Philostratus, Cambridge [Mass.]--Londres, 1949, ad loc.).
(15) "Should you this year set eyes on a male Hyena," writes the Roman naturalist Aelian, "next year you will see the same creature as a female; conversely, if you see a female now, next time you will see a male.
Roman writers of natural history works, such as Aelian and Pliny, who followed Aristotle, were compilers of available information.
By the first century CE, the seraglio motif had embedded itself so firmly in the popular imagination that biographers and historians like Plutarch and, later, Aelian were using the stereotypical image of the seraglio as factual content in the composition of their Eastern histories.
Other artists were said to have gone one further: Pliny, for example, is one of several Roman imperial authors to tell how Myrmecides and Callicrates created miniature sculptures that could be 'concealed by the wings of a fly'; according to Plutarch and Aelian, writing soon after Pliny, the same duo were also said to have miniaturised the Iliad and Odyssey--not this time on a nut-contained parchment, but on a still tinier sesame seed.
(16) The Tactiks of Aelian: or, Art of Embattailing an army after ye Grecian manner, trans.