Aelian

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Aelian

(ē`lēən), fl. 2d cent. A.D., Greek rhetorician, b. Praenesta; his original name was Claudius Aelianus. He taught rhetoric in Rome c.220. His works, all in Greek, include Historical Miscellanies, stories of supernatural occurrences throughout history; and On the Characteristics of Animals. Both of these are largely extant. He also wrote Peasant Letters, 20 fictitious letters from farmers from Attica.
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Aelianus Tacticus was a Greek military writer of the second century AD, author of the military treatise On Tactical Arrays of the Greeks.
'Tiberius Plautius Aelianus: legat de Mesie sous Neron.' AC 3:121-161.
Particularly brief are the tales that form the first section of the book (written under the influence of the second-century Hellenistic writer Claudius Aelianus; the Russian translation of Aelianus's Varia Historia was published in Moscow in 1963).
In the edition of Justinus edited by the Strassburg professor Matthias Bernegger and printed in 1631, for example, it is Diodorus's version of Semiramis's life, along with Plutarch's and Aelianus's high-lighting of the clever way in which she usurped Ninus's throne, that are referenced in the notes to the final line of Justinus's book 1, chapter 1, when Semiramis's name is mentioned for the first time.(49) Lohenstein used Bernegger's Justinus commentary in another play about the African queen Sophonisbe, made famous for her resistance to the Romans in the Second Punic War.(50) We can surmise that it is this edition that he used in composing the Agrippina as well.
The Accusers (# 15 in the series), which takes place back in Rome, pits Falco and Helena's two brothers, Aelianus and Justinus, against corrupt lawyers.
Part 4 of the same volume(22) opens with three papers on Herodian, the best of which has Sidebottom attempting to shift interest from assessment of sources and reliability to interest and intentions, and then moves on to single contributions on Claudius Aelianus, Asinius Quadratus, the rhetoricians Cassius Longinus and Menander, Heliodorus, Nemesianus (most unusually only a couple of pages), Reposianus, the
The statue is described by Aelianus (VH 9.39) as standing [text NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] cf.
[T]his attack upon Socrates was contrived by Anytus and Melitus as a prelude to their criminal accusation of him: this Aelianus expressly asserts, adding that the faction were afraid of his popularity, and therefore set Aristophanes upon him to feel the pulse of the people before they ventured to their public charge against him.
A neglected passage of the Epitome de Caesaribus sheds light on Casperius Aelianus's role in the mutiny, to which Berriman & Todd do not pay sufficient attention: