Aenesidemus


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Aenesidemus

(ēnĕs'ĭdē`məs), Greek skeptic philosopher, fl. probably 1st cent. B.C. Thought to be a native of Knossos, Crete, he taught in Alexandria. Although his writings have been lost, it is known that his main contributions were 10 tropoi (ways to conduct arguments) that appeared in Pyrrhonian Discourses. His arguments, which point to the impossibility of knowledge, made him one of the leading skeptics.
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The topics include Hegel's critique of skepticism and the concept of determinate negation, the conception of philosophizing, Hegel on skepticism in the logic of essence, the problem of action in Pyrrhonian skepticism, Friedrich Schlegel's skeptical interpretation of Plato, the reception of Aenesidemus in Fichte and Hegel, and the history of philosophy of science and Hegel's critique of skepticism.
Recension des Aenesidemus, en Johann Gottlieb Fichtes sammtliche Werke, 8 Bande, herausg.
Por eso la tesis de Surber consiste en que el "Von der Sprachhaftigkeit und dem Ursprunge der Sprache" constituye una respuesta a la metacritica, sumada a las argumentaciones que Fichte ya habia esgrimido en el Aenesidemus contra el escepticismo en general.
La posicion esceptica, representada ante todo por el Aenesidemus de Schulze (5), era frecuentemente desestimada por medio de un ejercicio de fundamentacion ultima de los fundamentos de la filosofia en general unida a Fichte.
After the period of the domination of Academic scepticism, Pyrrhonism is revived by Aenesidemus of Cnossos (probably in the first century BCE).
The chapter continues by touching helpfully on the history of Pyrrhonism between Aenesidemus and Sextus and on the relations between Pyrrhonism and medical thought, and closes with a longer section entitled "Sextus Empiricus: his life and writings.
Sextus devotes nearly half of book 1 of the Outlines to the most famous of these, the ten tropes of Aenesidemus (first century B.
26) The epistemological doctrine of the Cyrenaics was probably developed by Aristippus the Younger, who may have been born around 380-370 BC If so, the doubts of the Cyrenaics concerning the knowledge of other minds may be placed towards the middle of the fourth century BC Theodosius' argument about other minds was probably formulated much later, after the revival of the Pyrrhonist movement by Aenesidemus in the first century B.
10) As in the tropoi tes epoches (grounds of suspense of judgment) ascribed to Aenesidemus of Cnossos.
14) See Gottlob Ernst Schulze, Aenesidemus oder uber die Fundamente der von Herrn Professor Reinhold in Jena gelieferten Elementar-Philosophie.
Aenesidemus left the Academy because, in his eyes, the Academics were not real skeptics but Stoics fighting Stoics, and it was Pyrrho whom he adopted as a forerunner of his radical skepticism.
And of course, Aenesidemus, the reviver of Pyrrhonism, complained that the Academy's position had become little more than an echo of Stoicism, and seemed to think that the difference that remained between them over the cognitive impression was of little consequence (Photius, Bibliotheca, 170a14-21).