Aenesidemus


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Aenesidemus

(ēnĕs'ĭdē`məs), Greek skeptic philosopher, fl. probably 1st cent. B.C. Thought to be a native of Knossos, Crete, he taught in Alexandria. Although his writings have been lost, it is known that his main contributions were 10 tropoi (ways to conduct arguments) that appeared in Pyrrhonian Discourses. His arguments, which point to the impossibility of knowledge, made him one of the leading skeptics.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the period of the domination of Academic scepticism, Pyrrhonism is revived by Aenesidemus of Cnossos (probably in the first century BCE).
10) As in the tropoi tes epoches (grounds of suspense of judgment) ascribed to Aenesidemus of Cnossos.
14) See Gottlob Ernst Schulze, Aenesidemus oder uber die Fundamente der von Herrn Professor Reinhold in Jena gelieferten Elementar-Philosophie.
Nebst angehangten Briefen des Philaletes an Aenesidemus, in GW 5:185; Cassirer, Das Erkenntnisproblem, 80-1.
Aenesidemus left the Academy because, in his eyes, the Academics were not real skeptics but Stoics fighting Stoics, and it was Pyrrho whom he adopted as a forerunner of his radical skepticism.
The contextual role of Schulze's 1792 Aenesidemus for Fichte's early philosophy--which occupies one-third of the book--is fully exploited (chapters 10-11).
26797) and of Carlos Levy's paper on the issue of the historical legitimacy of skepticism, namely on the way Aenesidemus and Sextus Empiricus looked at Pyhrro (pp.
Without that, Pyrrhonists cannot reject competing claims about reality, as Aenesidemus routinely does; instead they must remain open to the possibility that any view may be true or false of the nature of things.
The sources for Aenesidemus are much better; Bett's use of evidence here is judicious, philosophically astute, and historically plausible.
underwent significant changes through the works of Timon of Phlius, Aenesidemus of Cnossos, Agrippa, and then Sextus himself and beyond.
In his early "Review of Aenesidemus," Fichte first concedes that Kant's things-in-themselves are inherently contradictory, in that one cannot posit the necessity of an inaccessible ground for intuition.
Fichte, "Review of Aenesidemus, " in early Philosophical Writings, trans.