Aerarium


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Aerarium

 

in ancient Rome, the government treasury, housed in the temple of the god Saturn. In republican times, the aerarium was administered by quaestors under the supervision of the Senate; under the empire, it was directed by praetors, but the emperor effectively controlled it. The aerarium gradually became indistinguishable from the fiscus, the private imperial treasury established by the emperor Augustus.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

aerarium

In ancient Rome, the public treasury.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Contudo, algumas foram estabelecidas em leis ou Ordenacoes, em que a pena era paga para o Estado ou para o tesouro municipal, ou dividido entre o aerarium e o acusador, como, por exemplo, a prevista em um decreto do Senado para o caso de danos aos aquedutos (D.
Cada conquista era aprovechada por Roma para crear una administracion fiscal y financiera, que actuaba en beneficio directo del Aerarium Senatorial (en la Republica) y, posteriormente, del Fiscus Cesaris (ya en el Imperio).
The budget of the provinces that the Senate administered, as opposed to the emperor's imperial or personal budget, was called the "Aerarium." Although in theory the Senate still controlled the Aerarium, the public treasury often proved to be insufficient, and Augustus frequently supplemented the Aerarium with his own personal funds.
The document adds a considerable number of details to those recorded by Tacitus.(2) Quite apart from its main theme, the text has shed light on such thorny problems as the definition of imperium maius, and the relationship between the fiscus and aerarium.(3) The aim of this article, however, is not to investigate such matters, but to consider the rhetorical language with which the Senate treats the whole affair.
123 praeesse<n>t, venire et in aerarium redigi placere.