air power

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air power

The power that a nation derives from its ability to fly a vehicle, or to cause it to go through the medium of air or space, and to exploit in lesser or greater degree the complex relationship that results from this ability. A nation's air power consists of all the elements of air forces, including aircraft, infrastructure, radar, surface-to-air weapons, and personnel, as well as civil, private, and commercial aviation.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is mentionable that some opine that India and Pakistan have made contradictory claims of victory during aerial warfare of the 1965 war.
Critique: Profusely illustrated enhancing expert commentary, "Drone Strike!: UCAVs and Unmanned Aerial Warfare in the 21st Century" is an impressively informed and informative study that is thoroughly 'reader friendly' in organization and presentation.
Despite its shortcomings, Whitey is a fascinating book for readers interested in learning about a driving force in the development of Navy fighter aviation and the Pacific theater of aerial warfare. Rather than a riveting and colorful biography of a larger-than-life individual, it hints at the possibility of a much more in-depth and captivating story.
For the US Air Force, it was John Warden and, to a lesser extent, John Boyd, who invented entirely new concepts for aerial warfare, but who could never get out of their own way enough to maximize the effect of their ideas.
The First World War ushered in the age of large-scale aerial warfare, and with it came a series of artworks on the theme of flight.
Air Force to that of the Royal Air Force, the aerial warfare branch of the British Armed Forces, which is also the oldest independent air force in the world; and the Luftwaffe, the aerial warfare branch of the German Wehrmacht during World War II.
In his address to the graduating Combat Commanders, the Air Chief said, "Nature of aerial warfare continues to rise in complexity under a time compressed scenario.
In her blog post [see sidebar], "Will the QF-16 be the next step in drone warfare?", my colleague, Kasey Panetta suggested that the QR-16 could represent the natural evolution in aerial warfare. Kasey says "Why risk a pilot's life when the planes can be controlled from the ground?" And the F-16 sports aerial capabilities that dwarf our current arsenal of Predators, Reapers, and other UAVs.
Of particular interest was the display of the new bomber, the Armstrong Whitley which was the latest thing in aerial warfare. The monoplane bomber powered by two Armstrong engines was capable of a top speed of 250 miles per hour and represented the greatest advance that had been made in the air.
This lovely hardback pairs information about aerial warfare and Stalingrad with a vivid colorful account of one Johnny Redburn, discharged from the RAF for killing an officer and fighting against Germans from afar.
The plan to use a drone, described to the Global Times newspaper by a senior public security official, highlights China's increasing advances in unmanned aerial warfare, a technology dominated by the United States and used widely by the Obama administration for the targeted killing of terrorists.
Wings: One Hundred Years of British Aerial Warfare. Patrick Bishop.