air power

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air power

The power that a nation derives from its ability to fly a vehicle, or to cause it to go through the medium of air or space, and to exploit in lesser or greater degree the complex relationship that results from this ability. A nation's air power consists of all the elements of air forces, including aircraft, infrastructure, radar, surface-to-air weapons, and personnel, as well as civil, private, and commercial aviation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first, staged for Hitler in November 1943, was intended to introduce him to the new weapons and signaled the opening of a new chapter in aerial warfare.
If you're after some Michael Bay-style explosions, a Top Gunlike glamorisation of aerial warfare and the ability to fire off a dozen homing missiles with a flick of your finger, you'll certainly have a good time.
If you're after some Michael Bay-style explosions, a Top Gun-like glamorisation of aerial warfare and the ability to fire off a dozen homing missiles with a flick of your ring finger, you'll have a good time.
Photos and drawings in color illustrate the Mirage III aircraft and MiG 21 operations during the key aerial warfare scenarios of the times, making this a top pick for any military collection.
There exists a memorandum dated March 1941 from Admiral Edward Kalbfus (researched by Naval War College faculty and students), recommending a strategy of unrestricted submarine and aerial warfare against Japan, that was clearly rejected by the General Board.
Air Force from a service that was conceived to fight aerial warfare to one that works 100-percent in support of ground forces, Kaplan said.
Metin Gurak, chairman of the Communication Department of the Turkish General Staff, said on Friday that Turkish pilots, who got training in Britain during World War II, were never assigned in active aerial warfare and bombardment flights.
It also accounts for the largest single day of aerial warfare losses.
WITH both teams intent upon aerial warfare and a referee reluctant to utilise the sin-bin, entertainment at Eugene Cross Park was as at a premium, writes Barri Hurford.
It was the start of a crisis which was to culminate in coalition forces launching Desert Storm on January 17, 1991 - the longest air strike in the history of aerial warfare.
The closing section, for instance, on the morality of aerial warfare is rather woolly and the author wrestles somewhat inconclusively with the thorny issues of guilt and remembrance.