Aesculus


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Aesculus

[‚es·kyə·ləs]
(botany)
A genus of deciduous trees or shrubs belonging to the order Sapindales. Commonly known as buckeye.

Aesculus

 

a genus of tree and, less frequently, shrub of the family Hippocastanaceae. The leaves, which are opposite and digitately compound, usually have five to nine leaflets. The irregular flowers are gathered in erect paniculate inflorescences. There are approximately 15 species (according to other data, 25), growing in Europe (the Balkan Peninsula), Asia (the Himalayas, China, and Japan), and North America. One of the most common is the horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), often grown in gardens and parks. The tree measures up to 30 m tall; its trunk is up to 2 m in diameter. The crown is broad and full. An extract of the roots is used in medications for hemorrhoids, dilation of the veins, thrombophlebitis, atherosclerosis, and other conditions.

References in periodicals archive ?
Once these simple measures are employed, it is also beneficial to start taking 20 drops of aesculus hippocastanum (horse chestnut) twice daily in a little water just after meals.
Descricao da relacao entre Aesculus hippocastanum/ Horse chestnut ou seu principio ativo a aescin, [beta]-Escina e seu efeito diuretico e anti-inflamatorio, Hibiscus sabdariffa.L e seu efeito diuretico, alem de procurar as doses recomendadas e seguras bem como a sua interacao com medicamentos e seu efeito durante a gestacao e lactacao.
Bionomics of the horse-chestnut leaf miner Cameraria ohridella Deschka & Dimic 1986, a pest on Aesculus hippocastanum in Europe (Insecta, Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae).
Murakami et al., "Escins-Ia, Ib, Ila, and IIIa, bioactive triterpene oligoglycosides from the seeds of Aesculus hippocastanum L.: their inhibitory effects on ethanol absorption and hypoglycemic activity on glucose tolerance test," Chemical & Pharmaceutical Bulletin, vol.
Palatable trees like willows, oak, and aesculus are harvested to feed livestock during winter months when the area remains covered by heavy snowfall.
Species Stems DEN RDEN BA RBA RIV Acer negundo 360 80.9 41.9 8.7 38.0 40.0 Populus deltoides 97 21.8 11.3 4.2 18.3 14.8 Acer saccharinum 103 23.1 12.0 2.7 11.8 11.9 Platanus occidentalis 69 15.5 8.0 2.8 12.1 10.1 Juglans nigra 85 19.1 9.9 1.7 7.3 8.6 Aesculus glabra 36 8.1 4.2 0.6 2.5 3.4 Celtis occidentalis 26 5.8 3.0 0.8 3.5 3.2 Ulmus americana 20 4.5 2.3 0.3 1.1 1.7 Fraxinus spp.
(4.) Geetha et al, In Vitro Antioxidant and free Radical Scavenging activity of the Ethanolic extract of Aesculus hippocastanum Int.
Aesculus species have different medicinal or cosmetic uses, and the bark of the horse chestnut contains low amounts of gallic and tannic acids which are used in industrial applications.
One of the best-known natural diagnostic materials comes from the bark of the horse-chestnut tree (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) and is called esculin.
One of the most widely used nutraceutical approaches for varicose veins is horse chestnut seed extract (Aesculus hippocastanum).
For example, the Bottlebrush Buckeye, Aesculus parviflora, is a native shrub form of the better known horse chestnut tree.
During afforestation twelve tree species were planted in the area which include Acer negundo, Aesculus indica, Ailanthus altissima, Albizia julibrissin, Catalpa bignonioides, Cedrus deodara, Cupressus torulosa, Populus deltoides, Prunus armeniaca, Robinia pseudoacacia, Salix alba and Ulmus wallichiana.