aesthete

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aesthete

[′es‚thēt]
(botany)
A plant organ with the capacity to respond to definite physical stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a modernist whose aesthetic appetite has been fed at an earlier stage when he was a member of aesthete society at Oxford, Acton's negotiation with the spatiality of China in essence reflects his request to make up for the deficiency of beauty increasingly engendered by capital industrialization.
Like Kierkegaard's aesthetes, the addicts are trying to "aestheticize" their lives: they chase the pleasure-filled ideality in their head and ignore the actuality of their lives.
Deer describes Basil Seal Rides Again as an "obituary for the queer dandy aesthetes of wartime" (224).
In his 2005 book Building Jerusalem: The Rise and Fall of the Victorian City, Tristram Hunt observes 'the architects of the new industrial civilisation were sensitive to the charge of philistinism; that their cities, these testimonies to their wealth and influence, were little more than reflections of materialism and acquisitive individualism.' Applying the same discipline which had brought them wealth and influence, they set about improving their standard of taste, not least by paying attention to the Aesthetes' credo.
Chesterton, however, uses the occasion of the quarrel to paint Stothard's approach to art as akin to that of the aesthetes, in contrast to Blake's ethical approach; in fact, he treats the dispute with Stothard as the central event in Blake's life (or a least in Chesterton's life of Blake): "I make no excuse for dwelling at length on this in a life of Blake; it is the most important event.
Thin sections of the plates of the Pennsylvanian chiton Euleptochiton spatulatus (Hoare, Sturgeon and Hoare 1972) show the pattern and sizes of the aesthete canals.
Gilbert & Sullivan's sparkling satire on Oscar Wilde and the aesthetes sees Carl Rosa Company in sparkling form.
This new production of Patience is directed by Peter Mulloy and is a 19th Century sparkling satire on Oscar Wilde and the aesthetes.
It is Ashbery's compulsive need to separate the cool from the uncool, the forward-thinking aesthetes (the "we" in this particular poem) from the squawking and honking moralists, with "the very Dickens" bringing up the rear, the earnest Dickens.
The Aesthetes thought that, through artificiality, meaningless lives could conceivably be transfigured into beautiful works of art.
These ideas come out more clearly when we place Wilde among the female aesthetes, the women who collaborated with him while he was writing about dress for the Pall Mall Gazette and editing the Woman's World.