Aethalides


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Aethalides

herald of the Argonauts; had perfect memory. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 11]
See: Memory

Aethalides

herald of the Argonauts. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 11]
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4) In Nano's rendition of the "divine juggler's" shape shifting, we learn that the "fast and loose" soul was originally derived from Apollo, passed into Aethalides, Mercury's son, to "goldy-locked" Euphorbus, who was killed in the Trojan war, to Hermotimus, then to Pyrrhus of Delos, a Greek philosopher.
When the Argonauts reach the island of Lemnos, Apollonius of Rhodes tells us, they send their herald Aethalides to the ruler of the island.
Although avoiding verbatim repetition, the passage introducing Aethalides is infused with the language of memory and re-presentation, characterizing him as a privileged figure with the ability to look forwards and backwards in time.
5) The paternity of Aethalides is again emphasized in the digression that introduces him into the action of the poem (1.
Aethalides is presented as a conventional herald with a traditional epithet ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 641) and the sort of lineage one might expect for a herald.
A scholium cites Pherecydes as confirmation: he, too, told a story in which Aethalides split his time between upper and lower worlds.
Their knowledge of the Nachleben of Aethalides invites them to fill in the missing name, while his silence allows Apollonius to preserve the norms observed elsewhere in the poem: he never mentions non-fictional persons by name.
15) Forgetfulness becomes an antagonist that Aethalides is able to defeat ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 1.
Indeed, Goldhill has noticed the parallels between the [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] of Aethalides and the [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] sought by Achilles (Il.
Aethalides is said to be protected from [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] by the gift of memory from his father, Hermes.
Such meta-poetic language in the Aethalides digression mirrors issues of repetition and continuity that are found throughout the Argonautica.
The adverb suggests that the narrator is avoiding a detailed, blow-by-blow description of the entire Aethalides myth; however, an intertext with Callimachus offers an extra meta-narrative layer.