Æthelbald

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Æthelbald

(ĕ`thəlbôld, ă`–), d. 757, king of Mercia (716–57), grandson of a brother of Penda. He spent years in exile before he became king. A strong ruler, by 731 he controlled all England S of the Humber River and led expeditions into Northumbria (740) and against the Welsh (743). He was murdered by his bodyguard.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ceolred's surviving reputation is overwhelmingly a negative one: he is seen as a king who wrongly appropriated monastic resources and cruelly persecuted AEthelbald (d.
32) A passage at the end of this chapter, moreover, occurs almost verbatim in Boniface's letter to King AEthelbald of Mercia.
So too were King Aethelbald (716-57) and then King Offa (757-96), the most powerful Anglo-Saxon king before Alfred the Great of Wessex.
Although her father respects and trusts Aethelbald, he ignores the prince's warnings about imminent danger to Parumvir, and Aethelbald leaves the palace with a promise to return.
For a very brief moment, the kingdom of Mercia, ruled from the royal settlement of Tamworth by warriors such as Offa and Aethelbald, emerged from the shadows of Alfred's Wessex, perhaps to inspire a new generation of early medieval scholars.
In his epic narration of the history of the Anglo-Saxons, Bueno skips the so-called 'settlement period' (mid-5th to early 7th century) and starts with a section (11-17) on the rise of Mercia during the reigns of Penda (632-655) and AEthelbald (716-757).
The bank is one of the best preserved stretches of Wat's Dyke, built by King Aethelbald to protect Mercia after serious Welsh raids in 705 and 709AD.
Unlike Martin, who was a reluctant soldier and already "monkish" by disposition (73), Guthlac had been a willing warrior, and he must undergo a total spiritual transformation to understand the value of a Christian life as monk, hermit, and advisor to King Aethelbald.
It is understood that Wat's was built by King Aethelbald to mark the north-west frontier of Mercia.
An item of some substance in this very personal book is his speculation that Beowulf was composed in the second quarter of the eighth century at the court of AEthelbald of Mercia.
Charter evidence is minutely examined to track the development of early monastic life in the area, its links with the world outside, and the influence of the church under the rule of the two strong kings of Mercia in the eighth century, AEthelbald and Offa.