Athelstan

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Athelstan

Athelstan or Æthelstan (both: ăthˈəlstən, ăthˈĕlstän), d. 939, king of Wessex (924–39), son and successor of Edward the Elder. After coming to the throne, he vigorously built up his kingdom on the foundations established by his grandfather Alfred. He made himself overlord of all England, establishing his hegemony firmly by victory over a coalition of his enemies at Brunanburh in 937. He was popular as well as able, was generous to the church, and issued laws that attempted to impose royal authority on customary law. Athelstan married his sisters to Charles III of France, the French duke Hugh the Great, Otto I of Germany, and Louis, king of Arles. He was succeeded by his brother Edmund.

Bibliography

See F. M. Stenton, Anglo-Saxon England (3d ed. 1971).

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Athelstan

?895--939 ad, king of Wessex and Mercia (924--939 ad), who extended his kingdom to include most of England
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
With the exception of Armitage Robinson's often overlooked Oxford University Ford Lectures from 1923 and two articles of fundamental importance by Michael Wood in the early 1980s, historians have tended to steer clear of anything like a biography of AEthelstan.
Using the barest of references, Foot brings the image of AEthelstan into sharp relief.
(11) As in other works of an apparently similar kind, in Salas' chronological account, different amount of space is devoted to Ethelbert of Kent, Egbert, Edmund of East Anglia, Alfred, Edward, Aethelstan, Edward (his son), Edred, Edward Martyr, Svein, Cnut, Godwin, Harold and William.
The three articles on England more than confirm his insight, with the kind of concrete analysis at which Wormald excelled: for instance, Michael Wood traces a poem personally associated with AEthelstan to a manuscript brought to England by his tutor, John the Saxon.
A similar intention may lie behind the introduction of the style 'king of Albion' during the reign of AEthelstan. In a charter from 929 AEthelstan is described as 'dispensing the kingly government of all Albion'.
"King Sihtric of Dublin is set to marry Princess Edith, the sister of Aethelstan, the West Saxon King of England.
Abbo says that the Edmund story is one he received from the lips of the Archhbishop of Canterbury, who claims to have heard it in his youth at King Aethelstan's court.
The town's mint was known to be in production between the reigns of Aethelstan (924-936) and Stephen (1135-1154).
Another horse worth keeping an eye on from the Head stable is Khalid Abdullah's Take Heed, who won the Prix Aethelstan by five lengths.
4 To-phrases can be used at times, from poetry (Andreas 1284 and The Descent into Hell 69) to laws or charters (Law VI As (V AEthelstan) 8.9 and Ch1539 (Will of Wynflaed) 39), meaning 'to believe (in) or trust (in)': e.g.
Michael Wood offers new insights into the career and connections of Israel the Grammarian, (probably) an Irish scholar based on the Continent, who spent time at King AEthelstan's court.
Hywel appears in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as an under-king to Wessex's AEthelstan, but the earliest evidence for the law itself dates from 300 years after the historic Hywel lived.