Aetolia

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Aetolia

(ētōl`yə), region of ancient Greece, N of the Gulf of Corinth and the Gulf of Calydon, E of the Achelous River (separating it from Acarnania). Little is known of the early population of Aetolia, but later Aetolians, though they had coastal cities, were primarily an inland farming and pastoral people. They had famous shrines at Calydon (to Artemis) and at Thermum (to Apollo).

Aetolia

 

an ancient region in central Greece that was inhabited by Aetolian tribes. Aetolia was one of the most backward regions of the country, as it was surrounded and dissected by mountains and was also distant from the main cultural centers. It rose to political importance around the middle of the third century B.C., however, when the Aetolian League expanded beyond the boundaries of Aetolia; the federation included a number of poléis in northern and central Greece and the Peloponnesus. Aetolia was conquered by Rome in 189 B.C.

Aetolia

a mountainous region forming (with the region of Acarnania) a department of W central Greece, north of the Gulf of Patras: a powerful federal state in the 3rd century bc. Chief city: Missolonghi. Pop. (with Acarnania): 219 092 (2001). Area: 5461 sq. km (2108 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Johnston 158n and Maurach 1988: 33 suggest that this would need to be after the truce with the Aetolians dated to late 190/early 189; Gratwick 1982: 94 dates the play to 188/187, presumably in an attempt to match the play with the aftermath of the Aetolian truce and the final defeat of Antiochus in 187.
Two cities stand out in multiple references: Carthage, homeland of most of the principal cast (Carthaginienses is the first word of the plot explication at line 58), and Calydon, chief city of the Aetolian League, dramatic setting for this play and adopted city of the Carthaginian's nephew and daughters.
The Aetolians take the prominent role in the repulse of the Gauls before Delphi, and the divine elements of the Delphic tradition are conspicuously absent.
19) The provenance of Actes 21-24 suggests that the Aetolians issued a Panhellenic invitation: Athens, Chios, Tenos, and a Cycladic island.
6), the Aetolian leaders sent to Rome after the defeat at Callicinus/Callinicus in-171 (Livy 42.
Fulvius Nobilior's search for and punishment of the murderers of some Delphian envoys in 189/188, the Roman legates' verdict in 172, and, in 167, Paulus's investigation of the conduct of Aetolian leaders and his review of sentences passed by the Aetolian federal assembly, not to mention his execution of certain anti-Roman Greeks.
Thucydides implies that Demosthenes hesitated to advance on finding that the Aetolians knew of his plans and were gathering in force to oppose him.
A strong force under the Spartan Eurylochus, joined by the Aetolian army, now threatened Naupactus from the east; and it must have taken all his powers of persuasion to talk the disgruntled Acarnanians into sending 1000 hoplites to garrison the city.
Among other myths told at this festival are, first, that wine was brought from Aetolians, who were then killed; the Aetolian who had first planted a vine was Orestheus (often confused with Orestes); and second the story of Erigone's suicide by hanging.
lt;<Ancient International Law, the Aetolian League and the Ritual of Surrender during the Roman Republic: A Constructivist View>>, The International History Review, 31: 2, 2009, pp.
5 and the Origins of the Aetolian ethnos," Historia 37, pp.
In much the same way, the Aetolian expedition of the following year is similar to but shorter than Xenophon's version (Hell.