Aetolia

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Aetolia

(ētōl`yə), region of ancient Greece, N of the Gulf of Corinth and the Gulf of Calydon, E of the Achelous River (separating it from Acarnania). Little is known of the early population of Aetolia, but later Aetolians, though they had coastal cities, were primarily an inland farming and pastoral people. They had famous shrines at Calydon (to Artemis) and at Thermum (to Apollo).

Aetolia

 

an ancient region in central Greece that was inhabited by Aetolian tribes. Aetolia was one of the most backward regions of the country, as it was surrounded and dissected by mountains and was also distant from the main cultural centers. It rose to political importance around the middle of the third century B.C., however, when the Aetolian League expanded beyond the boundaries of Aetolia; the federation included a number of poléis in northern and central Greece and the Peloponnesus. Aetolia was conquered by Rome in 189 B.C.

Aetolia

a mountainous region forming (with the region of Acarnania) a department of W central Greece, north of the Gulf of Patras: a powerful federal state in the 3rd century bc. Chief city: Missolonghi. Pop. (with Acarnania): 219 092 (2001). Area: 5461 sq. km (2108 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
3.102.5 and the Origins of the Aetolian ethnos," Historia 37, pp.
(64.) Johnston 158n and Maurach 1988: 33 suggest that this would need to be after the truce with the Aetolians dated to late 190/early 189; Gratwick 1982: 94 dates the play to 188/187, presumably in an attempt to match the play with the aftermath of the Aetolian truce and the final defeat of Antiochus in 187.
The Aetolians legitimized and tightened their control of Delphi through their self-declared role in the repulse of the Gauls from the sanctuary.(1) In commemoration of their alleged heroics they reorganized the annual Amphictionic festival of thanksgiving into an Aetolian penteteric festival in 246/5.(2)
Now we know why Aeneas enters a little city in line 276 -- because Octavian brought Ambracians, Leucadians, Acarnanians, Amphilochian Argives, and Aetolians together to people his great new city of Nicopolis (Murray and Petsas, 5 n.25).
The historical precedent of this is established, according to Machiavelli, by the Greeks, who allowed the Aetolians to be conquered by the Romans and were themselves subsequently conquered by the Romans.
The Aetolians were threatening the important Athenian naval base of Naupactus, Leucas was now immobilized.
Among other myths told at this festival are, first, that wine was brought from Aetolians, who were then killed; the Aetolian who had first planted a vine was Orestheus (often confused with Orestes); and second the story of Erigone's suicide by hanging.
In much the same way, the Aetolian expedition of the following year is similar to but shorter than Xenophon's version (Hell.
22.14.1-5; Livy 39.34.6), the Aetolian leaders sent to Rome after the defeat at Callicinus/Callinicus in-171 (Livy 42.60.8-10; App.
It has become fashionable to date the Aetolian campaign a year later, to the winter of 321/20 (see L.