black

(redirected from African American)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to African American: African American Vernacular English

black

1. of the colour of jet or carbon black, having no hue due to the absorption of all or nearly all incident light
2. Chess Draughts
a. a black or dark-coloured piece or square
b. the player playing with such pieces
3. a black ball in snooker, etc
4. (in roulette and other gambling games) one of two colours on which players may place even bets, the other being red
5. Archery a black ring on a target, between the outer and the blue, scoring three points

Black

1
1. Sir James (Whyte). born 1924, British biochemist. He discovered beta-blockers and drugs for peptic ulcers: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1988
2. Joseph. 1728--99, Scottish physician and chemist, noted for his pioneering work on carbon dioxide and heat

Black

2
Sometimes derogatory a member of a dark-skinned race, esp someone of Negroid or Australoid origin

black

a term used to refer to a variety of non-white ethnic groups. Black is a preferred form, especially among ethnic groups of African origins, reflecting a pride and identity in being black. The use of the term is associated with the rise of black political activism in the US in the 1960s, and is reflected in the slogan ‘Black is Beautiful’. Other terms to describe black people, such as coloured, Negro or Negress, are now generally considered offensive.

In the UK (and elsewhere), however, there is controversy about the use of the term to describe ‘non-white’ persons of Asian origin. Many Asians object to the use of the word ‘black’ to describe them and argue that this usage confuses the identity of a large number of very different ethnic groups such as Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Indians, West Indians, Africans and so on. The counter argument is that ‘non-white’ persons in the UK can be subject to DISCRIMINATION and institutionalized RACISM whatever their ethnic or national origins. In this sense, groups of both African and Asian origin share, to a significant extent, a common experience. See also BLACK POWER MOVEMENT, NEGRITUDE.

black

[blak]
(chemistry)
Fine particles of impure carbon that are made by the incomplete burning of carbon compounds, such as natural gas, naphthas, acetylene, bones, ivory, and vegetables.
(communications)
(optics)
Quality of an object which uniformly absorbs large percentages of light of all visible wavelengths.

black

Western color for mourning. [Christian Color Symbolism: Leach, 242; Jobes, 357]
See: Death

black

symbol of sin and badness. [Color Symbolism: Jobes, 357]
See: Evil
References in periodicals archive ?
Ringwood's fashion advice, discussed in the third chapter, communicated to readers the idea that personal style is a public display of morality that could combat negative stereotypes of African American women.
For African American families these influences may include among other African traditions, conventional American (Eurocentric) expectations, popular culture movements, and subcultures of illicit drug use.
However, industry cynics sniff that Harlequin's overtures to African American readers are merely part of a corporate strategy to regain its dominance in the market it created.
African American males, faced with a dearth of same-sex productive, successful, contemporary models to emulate, may look to athletes and entertainers as a source of pride in themselves and their race and as an endorsement of a path to success that does not necessarily include catering to mainstream values (Majors & Billson, 1992).
McBride to "completely rebuild" its African American studies department and its curriculum.
Dillard, Professor in the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology at the University of Louisville, is an important contribution to the field because it provides valuable insights about counseling and understanding African Americans and their mental health concerns.
Nonetheless, Wendell Pritchett's book demonstrates the ongoing vitality of African American urban history as a field of scholarship.
Yet, a review of articles published in Professional School Counseling revealed virtually no information on the interaction between school counselors and African American parents.
In recent years impressive achievements in closing the economic and educational gap between white and black Americans have been shadowed by a persistent condition of poverty among African Americans and its associated social maladies.

Full browser ?