African Liberation Day


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African Liberation Day

May 25
While other holidays seek to commemorate the events and achievements of the past, African Liberation Day focuses attention on a goal that has not yet been fully realized: the liberation of all African people. The observance of this day can be traced back to April 15, 1958, when the Conference of Independent African States was held in Accra, Ghana. Attendees declared April 15 African Freedom Day, and between 1958 and 1963 this observance was supported by leaders worldwide, including President John F. Kennedy, Malcolm X, and Senator Hubert Humphrey in the United States.
As British and European colonies in Africa continued to win their independence during the 1950s and 60s, and as the civil rights movement in the United States began to achieve some success, 31 independent African countries met on May 25, 1963, to form the Organization of African Unity. They changed the name and the date of what now became African Liberation Day. In 1999 the group reorganized into the African Union.
Today, observances worldwide include marches, parades, rallies, and conferences. These events focus on celebrating freedom from colonialism, educating people about the progress of the African liberation movement, and speaking out against oppression. There are also sporting contests and tribal dances, particularly in Chad, Zambia, and other African states where it is a public holiday.
CONTACTS:
African Union
P.O. Box 3243
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
251-1-151-7700; fax: 251-1-151-7844
www.africa-union.org/root/au/index/index.ht
SOURCES:
AfrAmerHol-1991, p. 43
References in periodicals archive ?
As a photo-journalist he covered both African Liberation Day Celebrations and the 1st Martin Luther King, Jr.
African Liberation Day is increasingly being forgotten.
Almost half a century after the African Liberation Day was first celebrated, many Africans are still not at peace in their own countries.
Section two of the book provides detailed accounts of the organization, operation and impact of 1972's Gary Convention, African Liberation Day, and the evolution of the National Black Political Assembly.
These problems were evidenced in the rise and decline of the African Liberation Support Committee, the outgrowth of the highly successful 1972 African Liberation Day mobilisations.
In September 1972, Sadaukai organized a conference in Detroit, Michigan to plan mass demonstrations for 'African Liberation Day' hosted by the African Liberation Day Coordinating Committee which later became the African Liberation Support Committee that involved leaders of several shades of political opinion, including members of the Congressional Black Caucus, leaders of mainstream civil rights organizations, and those in the Black liberation movement.
In this context, Burke's photograph of a sea of people at African Liberation Day in Handsworth Park in 1979 registers primarily as a woolly hat-fest, but while it is refreshing to see an exhibition which does not define black history primarily in terms of political struggle or social unrest, the political can never be entirely separated from the personal.
And besides his work in coordinating African Liberation Day in Los Angeles, he helped to coordinate the Recruitment Orientation taskforce and becoming a lead propagandist via his photography, research, and journalist skills; he helped lead various campaigns under the AAPRP banner to expose the crack cocaine campaign designed to destroy African and other communities through the distribution of cocaine and arms, and notwithstanding, he was involved in activities around police abuse after Rodney King was beaten by the Los Angeles Police Department in 1991, and peace efforts between warring street organizations, and the Free the Geronimo Pratt campaign, which resulted in the freedom of Geronimo Ji-Jaga Pratt in 1997.
Participants at the first meeting decided that their support for the African struggle would be organized around mass demonstrations to be held on African Liberation Day in the month of May.