African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church

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African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church,

Methodist denomination. It was founded in 1796 by black members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in New York City and was organized as a national body in 1821. The church operates in the United States, Africa, South America, and the West Indies and maintains Livingstone College in Salisbury, N.C. The U.S. membership of the church in 1998 was about 1.2 million, making it one of the largest African Methodist bodies.

Bibliography

See D. H. Bradley, A History of the A.M.E. Zion Church (2 vol., 1956–70).

References in periodicals archive ?
The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, or Mother Zion, started, much like John Street, as an informal chapel where blacks held separate worship services beginning in 1796.
Third, the author provides plenty of information on Baptists and the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, two sets of church people often overlooked or given insufficient attention in scholarly works.
Walls, The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church: Reality of the Black Church (Charlotte, NC: A.M.E.
Rivers has won awards for his published books on slavery and the African Methodist Episcopal Zion churches.
Zion Church, James Hood's Sketch of the Early History of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, and Alexander Walters's My Life and Work are available from the University of North Carolina's "Documenting the American South" project, available at <http://docsouth.unc.edu>.
(2) (p 5) Yet, in spite of these restrictions, Harris observes, African-Americans were initially able to sustain a unified community in New York City through celebrations (such as that commemorating the end of international slave trade in 1806), mutual-aid societies and churches (such as the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church and the African Society), and eateries, taverns and dance halls (such as Thomas Downing's Oyster Bar on Broad Street).
Other predominantly African American denominations also began to publish hymns in the 19th century, including the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church (1838); The African Union Church (1839); the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church (1891); and The Church of Christ Holiness (1899).
Soon after his arrival in New Bedford, Massachusetts, Douglass became a leader in the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church.
About the late 1830s, Jesse Coleman, a fugitive slave from Baltimore, founded the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church.
She starts the book with Sarah Dudley Pettey, wife of a bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, who wrote the "Woman's Column" in the Star of Zion newsletter twice a month from 1896 to 1904.
In addition to Lyons' denomination, other participating church groups are: the Progressive National Baptist Convention, National Baptist Convention of America, African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church and the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church.
In 1796 black members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in New York City formed the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, which in 1821 was organized as a national group.

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