Cape Hunting Dog

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Cape Hunting Dog

 

(Lycaon pictus), a predatory mammal of the canine family, light in body; it has long legs, four toes on each foot, a large head, large and long ears, and a bushy tail. Body length, 1 m; tail length, up to 40 cm; height at shoulders, up to 75 cm; weight, up to 25 kg. The body is covered with short, sparse hair, and coloring is motley, with spots of white, black, and red shades forming very varied patterns. Cape hunting dogs inhabit the plains and savannas of Africa south of the Sahara. They hunt in packs of up to 20 or 30 and prey upon ungulates, following them rapidly and tirelessly. They destroy large numbers of such animals as antelopes and sheep. Ranging widely in search of prey, they hunt both in the daytime and at night. They have a loud bark. The female has litters of six to eight pups (in deep underground dens).

References in periodicals archive ?
Patterns of population subdivision, gene flow and genetic variability in the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus).
Farshid Mehrdadfar, manager of the animal collection department at AWPR, said: "The African wild dog is regarded as one of the endangered species among carnivores and is recognised by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).
As part of a conservation plan for the African wild dog, a captive breeding program was established in 1995 at Mkomazi Game Reserve, Tanzania, under the
In the early parts of the 20th century, colonial settlers exterminated African wild dog populations in many areas simply because their method of pack hunting was seen as unsporting.
The AWPR is the only zoo in the UAE that exhibits the African Wild Dogs and it is interesting to observe how these pups will behave in a social environment.
As a consequence, the African Wild Dog now finds itself on the endangered list and the risk of rabies to humans is high.
Large canids, such as the grey wolf, African wild dog and Asian dhole, live in groups to aid bringing down large prey; whereas smaller carnivores, such as meerkats and mongooses, do so to ward off predators.
In total, there are more than 90 animal species to choose from, ranging from the African wild dog to a striking zebra.
Al Ain: Al Ain Zoo has announced the opening of a new exhibit dedicated to the African wild dog (lycaon pictus), a critically endangered carnivore from Africa.
It is also good to note that the Rotary Club in Edinburgh has been handing out reconditioned computers to local charities for a small fee of pounds 10 and that one of these is heading towards the Trust after old friend John Gillon, the Secretary of the Hwange Conservation Society, (which raises funds for African Wild Dog Conservation and Research) approached them.
You can choose which animal you want to adopt from this list: White Rhinoceros, Burchell's Zebra, Giraffe, Cheetah, African Lion, African Elephant, African Wild Dog, Humboldt Penguin, Bactrian Camel, Bengal Tiger, Hippopotamus or Bengal Tiger.
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