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We suggest that, in contrast to these approaches, and when seen from a historical and cultural comparative perspective, such dialectics can also be found elsewhere, so that the ethical predicaments of African witchcraft should be considered to be nothing more than a variation of a thoroughly transversal phenomenon.
Currently, he is researching African witchcraft accusations and their social impact at the University of Bayreuth in Germany.
African witchcraft is no more a theory of the natural world than the Christian and Islamic dogma of Divine Providence is--what these three belief systems have in common is that they seek to articulate what is beyond empirical knowledge; but all may be pushed to a point where they imply the possibility of miracles (i.
The final part deals with ways that Pentecostalism deals with religious diversity, with contributions by editor Veli-Matti Karkkainen on the role of Pentecostal pneumatology, Opoku Onyinah on Pentecostal responses to African witchcraft, Amos Yong on responses to Buddhism, and Tony Richie on a Pentecostal theology of religions.
Both European and African witchcraft traditions reference the riding of poles (545), and Tituba's mentioning the involvement of outsiders might relate, according to Breslaw, to the "Guianese concept of the malevolent persona who inhabits a different village from its victim" ("Tituba's Confession" 546).
Comaroff, (eds) Modernity and its Malcontents: Ritual and Power in Postcolonial Africa (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993); Misty Bastian, "'Bloodhounds Who Have No Friends': Witchcraft and Locality in the Nigerian Popular Press," in Modernity and its Malcontents; Peter Geschiere, The Modernity of Witchcraft: Politics and the Occult in Postcolonial Africa (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1997); Adam Ashforth, Madumo: A Man Bewitched (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000); Elias Kifon Bongmba, African Witchcraft and Otherness: A Philosophical and Theological Critique of Intersubjective Relations (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2001).
He had been poisoned by a toxic calabar bean used in West African witchcraft rituals.
Hence, "witchdemonology" is used in this paper to describe the beliefs and practices of "deliverance ministry" in Africa, which this thesis assumes is a synthesis of the practices and beliefs of African witchcraft and Western Christian concepts of demonology and exorcism.
A BOY whose torso was found in the River Thames had been poisoned by a toxic calabar bean used in West African witchcraft rituals, police said yesterday.
Bongmba, Elias Kifon (2001) African Witchcraft and Otherness: A Philosophical and Theological Critique of Intersubjective Relations.
Geschiere also argues, in less convincing but nevertheless provocative fashion, that African witchcraft discourse has analogies in the personalized interpretations of political events in European and North American society.
In particular, Fields suggests, despite the overt hostility of colonial regimes to African witchcraft beliefs, state officials found themselves unable to rule without deferring to and tacitly participating in them: `witches' and witchdoctors' power inhabited the quotidian and the humdrum [for African populations].

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