Afrikaner

(redirected from Afrikanerdom)
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Afrikaner

a White native of the Republic of South Africa whose mother tongue is Afrikaans
References in periodicals archive ?
The future spiritual and societal failures lie within the ethos and mores of nineteenth-century Afrikanerdom itself.
Schoeman's vision of this declined and desperate manifestation of Afrikanerdom is based in their denial of relations with the other.
During the 1920s and 1930s, religious, cultural, and political organizations began to proliferate and flourish among the elite and middle-classes as Afrikanerdom sought to craft (some would argue, to recover nostalgically) a sense of community.
Dunbar Moodie, The Rise of Afrikanerdom (Berkeley, 1975), 36.
When I started thinking that this book might also be cultural critique, you know of Afrikanerdom and whatever, I first started with a knitting manual, but it didn't have enough of the right vocab, because I had to give Agaat an attribute, and the knitting didn't have [.
Here one sees another publication spotting this information, and with a different set of news values, framing Krog for its purposes as a young dissident voice of promise and hope from within the bastion of Afrikanerdom.
F Malan, one of the leading theologians who became prime minister of South Africa in 1948 when the National Party came to power, after defeating the Liberal United Parry of General Smuts, adopted this view of history: "The history of the Afrikaner reveals a determination and a definite purpose which make one feel that Afrikanerdom is not the work of man but the creation of God.
MvN: Of Afrikanerdom I just wanted to say that I think there is a genetic and blueprinted narcissism at work .
In Dot Serfontein's interpolated history recorded in A Change of Tongue, the Boers are described by the English as "orang-utans" (2003:150), and the cumulative effect of these images is a sense that Krog is situating Afrikanerdom as alterity.
In addition to the repressive role played by the more "obvious" organs of state (the military establishment, the security forces, the police), Afrikanerdom was also ideologically supported by prominent religious leaders and academics, the majority of whom found an enabling environment for their intellectual racism within the Afrikaner Broederbond.
According to Malan, Leroux laid bare the ideology underpinning Afrikanerdom, revealing "die ideologie agter en in die Afrikaner se sosiopolitieke, religieuse en moreel-filosofiese diskoerse tot in sy wese" ("the ideology behind and inside the Afrikaner's sociopolitical, religious and moral-philosophical discourses right down to the bone").
As a girl growing up in Stellenbosch, the bastion of Afrikanerdom and by extension apartheid, Melanie was insulated from the other South Africa outside the white areas.