afterimage

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Related to Afterimages: positive afterimage, negative afterimage

afterimage

[′af·tər‚im·əj]
(neuroscience)
A visual sensation occurring after the stimulus to which it is a response has been removed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Surprisingly, attention and awareness had different effects, the team reported in 2010 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences: The more attention a person deployed, the shorter the afterimage lasted.
But I think that the afterimages reflect brain activities and provide us the means to know those activities in a directly visible form," he added.
Dance Archives Manual Wins MARAC Publications Award," afterimages, 3, no.
Common visual disturbances attributed to HPPD are recurrent geometric hallucinations, perception of peripheral movement, colored flashes, intensified colors, palinopsia, positive afterimages, haloes around objects, macropsia, and micropsia occurring spontaneously in individuals with no prior psychopathology.
Afterimages of Gilles Deleuze's Film Philosophy is the result of this collaboration.
Philosophers who objected to Feigl's view shortly after his long essay was published were not generally bothered by the idea that an afterimage may be a physical occurrence in the brain; they were bothered by the idea that the qualities of the occurrence that we are or can be introspectively aware of in having the afterimage could be physical qualities.
There is always the past in present at any moment as the dark background holds an afterimage of forms that were there before.
Imagine a variant of the experiment, where the colored chips are replaced by afterimages.
Among the many attractions of Wonder and Science is its sustained scrutiny of the afterimages of a wide variety of texts, an approach that frees them to some extent of convenient generic classifications and the expectations that such taxonomies engender.
The Fiction of Geopolitics: Afterimages of Culture from Wilke Collins to Alfred Hitchcock.
Experts say beams from the pointers can leave afterimages in people's vision, cause temporary vision loss and are capable of damaging retinas and nerves in the eye.