Agapornis


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Related to Agapornis: lovebirds, Love bird

Agapornis

 

a genus of lovebirds of the order Psittaciformes. Body length, 13–17 cm. The bright plumage is green with red, yellow, or dark blue markings. There are six species, distributed in tropical Africa and on Madagascar and neighboring islands. The birds live in forests and savannas; they are also encountered in mountains at elevations to 3, 000 m above sea level. They nest in the communal nests of weaverbirds, in tree hollows, and in termitaria; they line their nests with grass, which they carry in their rump feathers. There are four to six white eggs in a clutch; the eggs are incubated for 21–25 days.

The Agapornis feed on seeds, berries, and small fruits. They mate for life. These lovebirds are often kept in captivity. The Russian name for the genus Agapornis, nerazluchniki, is sometimes used to designate the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus).

References in periodicals archive ?
Pericardiocentesis and the use of enalapril in a Fischer's lovebird (Agapornis fischeri).
Key words: synovial sarcoma, fracture-associated sarcoma, intramedullary pin, air sac metastasis, avian, lovebird, Agapornis roseicollis
A 17-year-old female peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis) was examined because of swelling and signs of pain in the distal right dorsal wing.
Lastly, Cryptosporidium avian genotype III was isolated in numerous peach-faced lovebirds (Agapornis roseicollis) in Japan.
Cryptosporidium avian genotype III as a possible causative agent of chronic vomiting in peach-faced lovebirds (Agapornis roseicollis).
Similar to this case, Aspergillus species have been the causative agent of fungal keratitis in other avian reports, including A fumigatus in chickens, (2-4) as well as in a lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis).
(1) Idiopathic epilepsy is a diagnosis of exclusion and has been reported presumptively in peach-faced lovebirds (Agapornis roseicollis), red-lored Amazon parrots (Amazona autunmalis), cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus), double yellow-headed Amazon parrots (Amazona oratrix), and mynah birds (Gracula religiosa).
No significant association between butyrylcholinesterase concentrations and feather-damaging behavior could be established except in lovebirds (Agapornis species).
The lovebirds group comprised the following species: black-cheeked lovebird (Agapornis nigrigenis), Fischer's lovebird (Agapornis fischeri), rosyfaced lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis), and yellow-collared lovebird (Agapornis personata).